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System Administration Guide: Network Services
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Configuring the Dial-in Server

The tasks in this section are for configuring the dial-in server. The dial-in server is a peer machine that receives the call over the PPP link from the dial-out machine. The tasks show how to configure the dial-in server myserver that was introduced in Figure 16-1.

Tasks for Configuring the Dial-in Server (Task Map)

Table 17-3 Task Map for Setting Up the Dial-in Server

Task

Description

For Instructions

1. Gather preconfiguration information

Gather data that is needed prior to setting up the link, such as peer host names, target phone numbers, and modem speed.

Planning a Dial-up PPP Link

2. Configure the modem and serial port

Set up the modem and serial port.

How to Configure the Modem and Serial Port (Dial-in Server)

3. Configure calling peer information

Set up the user environments and PPP options for every dial-out machine that is permitted to call the dial-in server.

How to Configure Users of the Dial-in Server

4. Configure the serial-line communication

Configure the characteristics of the transmission across the serial line.

How to Define Communications Over the Serial Line (Dial-in Server)

Configuring Devices on the Dial-in Server

The following procedure explains how to configure the modem and serial port on the dial-in server.

Before you do the next procedure, you must have completed the following activities on the peer dial-in server:

  • Installed the Solaris 9 release or Solaris 10 release

  • Determined the optimum modem speed

  • Decided which serial port to use

How to Configure the Modem and Serial Port (Dial-in Server)

  1. Program the modem, as instructed in the modem manufacturer's documentation.

    For other suggestions, refer to How to Configure the Modem and Serial Port (Dial-out Machine).

  2. Attach the modem to the serial port on the dial-in server.
  3. Become superuser on the dial-in server or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  4. Configure the serial port by using the /usr/sadm/bin/smc command for the Solaris Management Console, as described in Setting Up Terminals and Modems With Serial Ports Tool (Overview) in System Administration Guide: Advanced Administration.

    Use the Solaris Management Console to do the following:

    1. Select the serial port where you have attached the modem.
    2. Specify modem direction as dial-in only.

      Note - Solaris PPP 4.0 does support bidirectional communications for a modem.


    3. Click Okay to convey the changes.

How to Set the Modem Speed

The next procedure explains how to set the modem speed for a dial-in server. For suggestions about speeds to use with Sun Microsystems' computers, see Configuring Modem Speed for a Dial-up Link.

  1. Log in to the dial-in server.
  2. Use the tip command to reach the modem.

    Instructions for using tip to set the modem speed are in the tip(1) man page.

  3. Configure the modem for a fixed DTE rate.
  4. Lock the serial port to that rate, using ttymon or /usr/sadm/bin/smc, as discussed in Setting Up Terminals and Modems With Serial Ports Tool (Overview) in System Administration Guide: Advanced Administration.
See Also

The following list provides references to related information.

Setting Up Users of the Dial-in Server

Part of the process of setting up a dial-in server involves configuring information about each known remote caller.

Before starting the procedures in this section, you must have done the following:

  • Obtained the UNIX user names for all users who are permitted to log in from remote dial-out machines.

  • Set up the modem and serial line, as described in How to Configure the Modem and Serial Port (Dial-in Server).

  • Dedicated an IP address to be assigned to incoming calls from remote users. Consider creating a dedicated incoming IP address if the number of potential callers exceeds the number of modems and serial ports on the dial-in server. For complete information about creating dedicated IP addresses, go to Creating an IP Addressing Scheme for Callers.

How to Configure Users of the Dial-in Server

  1. Become superuser on the dial-in server or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Create a new account on the dial-in server for each remote PPP user.

    You can use the Solaris Management Console to create a new user. The /usr/sadm/bin/smc command opens the Solaris Management Console. For instructions about creating a new user through Solaris Management Console, see Setting Up User Accounts (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  3. Use Solaris Management Console to assign parameters for the new user.

    For example, the following table shows the parameters for an account that is called pppuser for user1 on the dial-out machine myhome.

    Parameter

    Value

    Definition

    User Name

    pppuser

    The user account name for the remote user. This account name should correspond to the account name that is given in the login sequence of the chat script. For example, pppuser is the account name that is found in the chat script in How to Create the Instructions for Calling a Peer.

    Login Shell

    /usr/bin/pppd

    The default login shell for the remote user. The login shell /usr/bin/pppd initially restricts the caller to a dedicated PPP environment.

    Create Home Dir Path

    /export/home/pppuser

    The home directory /export/home/pppuser is set when the caller successfully logs in to the dial-in server.

  4. Create for each caller a $HOME/.ppprc file that contains various options that are specific to the user's PPP session.

    For example, you might create the following .ppprc file for pppuser.

    # cat /export/home/pppuser/.ppprc
    noccp

    noccp turns off compression control on the link.

See Also

The following list provides references to related information.

Configuring Communications Over the Dial-in Server

The next task shows how to enable the dial-in server to open communications with any dial-out machine. The options that are defined in the following PPP configuration files determine how communications are established.

  • /etc/ppp/options

  • /etc/ppp/options.ttyname

For detailed information about these files, refer to Using PPP Options in Files and on the Command Line.

Before you proceed, you should have done the following:

How to Define Communications Over the Serial Line (Dial-in Server)

  1. Become superuser on the dial-in server or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Create the /etc/ppp/options file with the following entry.
    nodefaultroute

    nodefaultroute indicates that no pppd session on the local system can establish a default route without root privileges.


    Note - If the dial-in server does not have an /etc/ppp/options file, only the superuser can run the pppd command. However, the /etc/ppp/options file can be empty.


  3. Create the file /etc/options.ttyname to define how calls that are received over serial port ttyname should be handled.

    The following /etc/options.ttya file defines how the dial-in server's serial port /dev/ttya should handle incoming calls.

    :10.0.0.80
    xonxoff
    :10.0.0.80

    Assigns the IP address 10.0.0.80 to all peers that are calling in over serial port ttya

    xonxoff

    Allows the serial line to handle communications from modems with software flow control enabled

See Also

If you have followed all the procedures in this chapter, you have completed the configuration of the dial-up link. The following list provides references to related information.

  • To test modem connectivity by dialing out to another computer, see cu(1C) and tip(1) man pages. These utilities can help you test if your modem is properly configured. Also, use these utilities to test if you can establish a connection with another machine.

  • To configure more options for the dial-in server, see Configuring the Dial-in Server.

  • To configure more dial-out machines, see Configuring the Dial-out Machine.

  • To have the remote machine call the dial-in server, see Calling the Dial-in Server.

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