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Solaris Trusted Extensions User's Guide
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Working on a Labeled System


Caution - If the trusted stripe is missing from your workspace, contact the  security administrator. The problem with your system could be serious.

The trusted stripe should not appear during login, or when you lock your screen. If the trusted stripe shows, contact the administrator immediately.


How to Lock and Unlock Your Screen

If you leave your workstation briefly, lock the screen.

  1. To lock your screen, do one of the following:
    • In Trusted CDE, click the screen lock icon in the workspace switch area of the Front Panel.
      Figure 3-1 Front Panel Switch Area
      Front panel shows the screen lock icon to the left of the switch area, and the exit button to the right.
    • In Trusted GNOME, choose Lock Screen from the Main menu.

      The screen turns black. At this point, only you can log in again.


      Note - The trusted stripe should not appear when the screen is locked. If the stripe does appear, notify the security administrator immediately.


  2. To unlock your screen, do the following:
    1. Move your mouse until the Lock Screen dialog box is visible.

      If the Lock Screen dialog box does not appear, press the Return key.

    2. Type your password.

      This action returns you to your session in its previous state.

How to Log Out of Trusted Extensions

At most sites, the screen automatically locks after a specified period of idleness. If you expect to leave the workstation for awhile, or if you expect someone else to use your workstation, log out.

  1. To log out, do one of the following:
    • In Trusted CDE, click the EXIT icon in the workspace switch area of the Front Panel.

      For a picture of the Front Panel, see Figure 3-1.

      The Logout Confirmation dialog box is displayed.


      Dialog box titled Logout Confirmation shows OK, Cancel, and Help buttons. Text tells you that your current session is saved.
    • In Trusted GNOME, choose Log Out your-name from the Main menu.
  2. Confirm that you want to continue to log out.
    • Click OK to log out.
    • Otherwise, click Cancel.

How to Shut Down Your System

Logging out is the normal way to end a Trusted Extensions session. Use the following procedure if you need to turn off your workstation.


Note - If you are not on the console, you cannot shut down the system. For example, Sun RayTM clients cannot shut down the system.


  • To shut down the system, do one of the following:
    • In Trusted GNOME, choose Shut Down from the Main menu.

      Confirm the shutdown.

    • In Trusted CDE, choose Suspend System from the Workspace menu.

      Click mouse button 3 over the background to open the menu.

      1. Confirm what you want to do.
        • Click Shutdown to shut down your system.
        • Click Suspend to put your system in power-saving mode.
        • Otherwise, click Cancel.

        Note - By default, the keyboard combination Stop-A (L1-A) is not available in Trusted Extensions. The security administrator can change this default.


How to View Your Files in a Labeled Workspace

To view your files, you use the same applications that you would use in Trusted CDE or Trusted GNOME on a Solaris system. If you are working at multiple labels, only the files that are at the label of the workspace are visible.

  1. In a Trusted CDE workspace, open a terminal window or the File Manager.
    • Open a terminal window and list the contents of your home directory.

      Click mouse button 3 over the background. From the Workspace menu, choose Programs –> Terminal.

    • On the Front Panel, click the File Manager.
      Figure 3-2 A Labeled File Manager
      Screen shows a File Manager that is labeled PUBLIC with files in the File Manager.

      The File Manager appears with the contents of your home directory at that label.

      The File Manager opens at the same label as the current workspace. The application provides access to only those files that are at its label. For details about viewing files at different labels, see Containers and Labels.

  2. In a Trusted GNOME workspace, open a terminal window or the File Browser.
    • Open a terminal window and list the contents of your home directory.

      Click mouse button 3 over the background. From the menu, choose Open Terminal.

    • Double-click the Documents folder or the This Computer folder on your desktop.

      These folders open in a File Browser. The File Browser application opens at the same label as the current workspace. The application provides access to only those files that are at its label. For details about viewing files at different labels, see Containers and Labels.

How to Access the Trusted Extensions Man Pages

How to Access Trusted Extensions Online Help

  1. In Trusted CDE, click the Help icon on the Front Panel.
    Figure 3-3 Trusted Extensions Online Help
    A window titled Help Viewer shows Solaris Trusted Extensions desktop help.
    1. Click the Index button.
    2. In the index, search All Volumes for the word Trusted.
    3. Click the links to find help that is specific to Trusted Extensions.
  2. In Trusted GNOME, click Help from the Trusted Path menu.
    • To open the Trusted Path menu, click the trusted symbol at the left of the trusted stripe.
    • To find task-specific help, click the Help button on the trusted application that you are currently using, such as the Device Manager.

How to Customize the CDE Workspace Menu

In Trusted CDE, users and roles can customize the Workspace menu for each distinct label.

  1. In your current workspace, start to customize the Workspace menu.
    • To add one or more items to the menu, choose the Add Item to Menu item.

      A dialog box with a Browse button appears.

    • To modify the menu or menu properties, choose Customize Menu item.

      A File Manager appears.

  2. If you are adding items to the Workspace menu, do the following:
    1. For each program, find the program and add it.

      Click the Browse button to show the files that are available for this workspace at this label.

    2. Select the program.
    3. Close the window.

      The items are added to the top of the Workspace menu.

  3. If you are modifying the Workspace menu, do the following:
    • To remove a menu item, click mouse button 3 over the item and click Put in Trash.
    • To change properties, such as permissions, click mouse button 3 over the item and click Properties.

      You can modify permissions here. You can also view file information and file sensitivity label.

  4. Confirm the menu changes, or cancel.
    • To confirm your changes, choose File –> Update Workspace Menu.

      The Workspace menu reflects your changes.

    • To cancel your changes, choose File –> Close.

How to Access Initialization Files at Every Label

Linking a file or copying a file to another label is useful when you want to make a file with a lower label visible at higher labels. The linked file is only writable at the lower label. The copied file is unique at each label and can be modified at each label. For more information, see .copy_files and .link_files Files in Solaris Trusted Extensions Administrator’s Procedures.

Before You Begin

You must be logged in to a multilevel session. Your site's security policy must permit linking.

Work with your administrator when modifying these files.

  1. Decide which initialization files you want to link to other labels.
  2. Create or modify the ~/.link_files file.

    Type your entries one file per line. You can specify paths to subdirectories in your home directory, but you cannot use a leading slash. All paths must be within your home directory.

  3. Decide which initialization files you want to copy to other labels.

    Copying an initialization file is useful when you have an application that always writes to a file with a specific name, and you need to separate the data at different labels.

  4. Create or modify the ~/.copy_files file.

    Type your entries one file per line. You can specify paths to subdirectories in your home directory, but you cannot use a leading slash. All paths must be within your home directory.

Example 3-1 Creating a .copy_files File

In this example, the user wants to customize several initialization files per label. In her organization, a company web server is available at the Restricted level. So, she sets different initial settings in the .mozilla file at the Restricted level. Similarly, she has special templates and aliases at the Restricted level. So, she modifies the .aliases and .soffice initialization files at the Restricted level. She can easily modify these files after creating the .copy_files file at her lowest label.

% vi .copy_files
# Copy these files to my home directory in every zone
.aliases
.mozilla
.soffice
Example 3-2 Creating a .link_files File

In this example, the user wants her mail defaults and shell defaults to be identical at all labels.

% vi .link_files
# Link these files to my home directory in every zone
.cshrc
.mailrc
Troubleshooting

These files do not have safeguards for dealing with anomalies. Duplicate entries in both files or file entries that already exist at other labels can cause errors.

How to Interactively Display a Window Label

This operation can be useful when your system is not configured to display labels in the window frames.

  1. Choose Query Window Label from the Trusted Path menu.

    The pointer changes to a question mark.

  2. Move the pointer around the screen.

    The label for the region under the pointer is displayed in a small rectangular box at the center of the screen.

    Figure 3-4 Query Window Label Operation
    Screen shows a window with a Query Window Label pointer, and a Window Label indicator that shows the label of the window being queried.
  3. Click the mouse button to end the operation.

How to Perform Some Common Desktop Tasks in Trusted Extensions

Some common tasks are affected by labels and security. In particular, the following tasks are affected by Trusted Extensions:

  • Emptying the trash

  • Finding calendar events

  • In Trusted CDE, restoring the Front Panel and using the Style Manager

  1. Empty the trash.

    The trash can contains files only at the label of the workspace. Delete sensitive information as soon as the information is in the trash can.

    • In Trusted CDE, open the Trash Can on the Front Panel.

      Choose File -> Select All, then File -> Shred. Then, confirm.

    • In Trusted GNOME, click mouse button 3 over the Trash Can icon on the desktop.

      Choose Empty Trash, then confirm.

  2. Find calendar events at every label.

    Calendars show only the events at the label of the workspace that opened the calendar.

    • In a multilevel session, open your calendar from a workspace that has a different label.
    • In a single-level session, log out. Then, log in at a different label to view the calendar events at that label.
  3. In Trusted CDE, restore the Front Panel by clicking the trusted stripe.

    A minimized Front Panel is restored.

  4. On both desktops, save a customized desktop at every label.

    You can customize the workspace configuration for every label at which you log in.

    1. Configure the desktop.

      Arrange windows, establish the font size, and perform other customizations.


      Note - Users can save desktop configurations. Roles cannot save desktop configurations.


    2. Save the current workspace.
      • In Trusted CDE, open the Style Manager. Choose your settings in the Startup icon.

        Note - The Style Manager requires the trusted path. Run the Style Manager from the Front Panel or from the Workspace menu, where the Style Manager has the trusted path.


        Your desktop is restored in this configuration when you next log in at this label.

      • In Trusted GNOME, click the Main menu.
        1. Click Preferences > Sessions.
        2. Click the Session Options button.
        3. Click Remember currently running applications, then close the dialog box.

        Your desktop is restored in this configuration when you next log in at this label.

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  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire