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System Administration Guide: Network Services
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Administering .forward Files

This section contains several procedures that are related to .forward file administration. Because these files can be edited by users, the files can cause problems. For more information, refer to .forward Files in Chapter 14, Mail Services (Reference).

Refer to the following:

How to Disable .forward Files

This procedure, which prevents automated forwarding, disables the .forward file for a particular host.

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Make a copy of /etc/mail/cf/domain/solaris-generic.m4 or your site-specific domain m4 file.
    # cd /etc/mail/cf/domain
    # cp solaris-generic.m4 mydomain.m4
    mydomain

    Use the file name of your choice.

  3. Add the following line to the file that you just created.
    define(`confFORWARD_PATH',`')dnl

    If a value for confFORWARD_PATH already exists in the m4 file, replace the value with this null value.

  4. Build and install a new configuration file.

    If you need help with this step, refer to How to Build a New sendmail.cf File.


    Note - When you edit the .mc file, remember to change DOMAIN(`solaris-generic') to DOMAIN(`mydomain').


How to Change the .forward–File Search Path

If, for example, you want to put all .forward files in a common directory, follow these instructions.

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Make a copy of /etc/mail/cf/domain/solaris-generic.m4 or your site-specific domain m4 file.
    # cd /etc/mail/cf/domain
    # cp solaris-generic.m4 mydomain.m4
    mydomain

    Use the file name of your choice.

  3. Add the following line to the file that you just created.
    define(`confFORWARD_PATH',`$z/.forward:/var/forward/$u')dnl

    If a value for confFORWARD_PATH already exists in the m4 file, replace the value with this new value.

  4. Build and install a new configuration file.

    If you need help with this step, refer to How to Build a New sendmail.cf File.


    Note - When you edit the .mc file, remember to change DOMAIN(`solaris-generic') to DOMAIN(`mydomain').


How to Create and Populate /etc/shells

This file is not included in the standard release. You must add the file if users are to be allowed to use .forward files to forward mail to a program or to a file. You can create the file manually by using grep to identify all of the shells that are listed in your password file. You can then type the shells into the file. However, the following procedure, which employs a script that can be downloaded, is easier to use.

  1. Download the script.

    https://www.sendmail.org/vendor/sun/gen-etc-shells.html

  2. Become root or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  3. To generate a list of shells, run the gen-etc-shells script.
    # ./gen-etc-shells.sh > /tmp/shells

    This script uses the getent command to collect the names of shells that are included in the password file sources that are listed in /etc/nsswitch.conf.

  4. Inspect and edit the list of shells in /tmp/shells.

    With the editor of your choice, remove any shells that you are not including.

  5. Move the file to /etc/shells.
    # mv /tmp/shells /etc/shells
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