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System Administration Guide: Devices and File Systems
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SPARC: Adding a System Disk or a Secondary Disk (Task Map)

The following task map identifies the procedures for adding a disk to a SPARC based system.

Task

Description

For Instructions

1. Connect the disk and boot.

System Disk

Connect the new disk and boot from a local or remote Solaris CD or DVD.

SPARC: How to Connect a System Disk and Boot

Secondary Disk

Connect the new disk and perform a reconfiguration boot so that the system will recognize the disk.

SPARC: How to Connect a Secondary Disk and Boot

2. Create slices and label the disk.

Create disk slices and label the disk if the disk manufacturer has not already done so.

SPARC: How to Create Disk Slices and Label a Disk

3. Create file systems.

Create UFS file systems on the disk slices by using the newfs command. You must create the root (/) or /usr file system, or both, for a system disk.

SPARC: How to Create a UFS File System

4. Restore file systems.

Restore the root (/) or /usr file system, or both, on the system disk. If necessary, restore file systems on the secondary disk.

Chapter 27, Restoring Files and File Systems (Tasks)

5. Install boot block.

System Disk Only. Install the boot block on the root (/) file system so that the system can boot.

SPARC: How to Install a Boot Block on a System Disk

SPARC: Adding a System Disk or a Secondary Disk

A system disk contains the root (/) or /usr file systems, or both. If the disk that contains either of these file systems becomes damaged, you have two ways to recover:

  • You can reinstall the entire Solaris OS.

  • Or, you can replace the system disk and restore your file systems from a backup medium.

A secondary disk does not contain the root (/) and /usr file systems. A secondary disk usually contains space for user files. You can add a secondary disk to a system for more disk space. Or, you can replace a damaged secondary disk. If you replace a secondary disk on a system, you can restore the old disk's data on the new disk.

SPARC: How to Connect a System Disk and Boot

This procedure assumes that the system is shut down.

  1. Disconnect the damaged system disk from the system.
  2. Ensure that the disk you are adding has a different target number than the other devices on the system.

    Typically, a small switch is located at the back of the disk for this purpose.

  3. Connect the replacement system disk to the system and check the physical connections.

    Refer to the disk's hardware installation guide for details.

  4. Follow the instructions in the following table, depending on whether you are booting from a local Solaris CD or DVD or a remote Solaris CD or DVD from the network.

    Boot Type

    Action

    From a Solaris CD or DVD in a local drive

    1. Make sure the Solaris Software 1 CD or the Solaris DVD is in the drive.

    2. Boot from the media to single-user mode:

    ok boot cdrom -s

    From the network

    Boot from the network to single-user mode:

    ok boot net -s

    After a few minutes, the root prompt (#) is displayed.

More Information
After You Connect a System Disk and Boot ...

After you boot the system, you can create slices and a disk label on the disk. Go to SPARC: How to Create Disk Slices and Label a Disk.

SPARC: How to Connect a Secondary Disk and Boot

If you are adding a disk with an EFI disk label, see EFI Disk Label for more information.

For more information about hot-plugging devices, see Chapter 6, Dynamically Configuring Devices (Tasks).

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.
  2. (Optional) If the disk type is unsupported by the Solaris software, add the device driver for the disk by following the instructions included with the hardware.

    For information on creating a format.dat entry for the disk, see How to Create a format.dat Entry, if necessary.

  3. Shut down the system.
    # shutdown -i0 -gn -y
    -i0

    Changes to run level 0, the power-down state.

    -gn

    Notifies logged-in users that they have n seconds before the system begins to shut down.

    -y

    Specifies that the command should run without user intervention.

    The ok prompt is displayed after the Solaris OS is shut down.

  4. Turn off the power to the system and all external peripheral devices.
  5. Ensure that the disk you are adding has a different target number than the other devices on the system.

    Typically, a small switch is located at the back of the disk for this purpose.

  6. Connect the disk to the system and check the physical connections.

    Refer to the disk's hardware installation guide for details.

  7. Turn on the power to all external peripheral devices.
  8. Turn on the power to the system.

    The system boots and displays the login prompt.

More Information
After You Connect a Secondary Disk and Boot ...

After you boot the system, you can create slices and a disk label on the disk. Go to SPARC: How to Create Disk Slices and Label a Disk.

SPARC: How to Create Disk Slices and Label a Disk

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.
  2. Invoke the format utility.
    # format

    A numbered list of available disks is displayed. For more information, see format(1M).

  3. Type the number of the disk that you want to repartition.
    Specify disk (enter its number): disk-number

    disk-number is the number of the disk that you want to repartition.

  4. Select the partition menu.
    format> partition
  5. Display the current partition (slice) table.
    partition> print
  6. Start the modification process.
    partition> modify
  7. Set the disk to all free hog.
    Choose base (enter number) [0]?1

    For more information about the free hog slice, see Using the Free Hog Slice.

  8. Create a new partition table by answering y when prompted to continue.
    Do you wish to continue creating a new partition table based on 
    above table[yes]? y
  9. Identify the free hog partition (slice) and the sizes of the slices when prompted.

    When adding a system disk, you must set up slices for:

    • root (slice 0) and swap (slice 1)

    • /usr (slice 6)

    After you identify the slices, the new partition table is displayed.

    For an example of creating disk slices, see Example 12-1.

  10. Make the displayed partition table the current partition table by answering y when prompted.
    Okay to make this the current partition table[yes]? y

    If you do not want the current partition table and you want to change it, answer no and go to Step 6.

  11. Name the partition table.
    Enter table name (remember quotes): "partition-name"

    where partition-name is the name for the new partition table.

  12. Label the disk with the new partition table after you have finished allocating slices on the new disk.
    Ready to label disk, continue? yes
  13. Quit the partition menu.
    partition> q
  14. Verify the disk label.
    format> verify
  15. Exit the format utility.
    format> q
Example 12-1 SPARC: Creating Disk Slices and Labeling a System Disk

The following example shows the format utility being used to divide a 18-Gbyte disk into three slices: one slice for the root (/) file system, one slice for the swap area, and one slice for the /usr file system.

# format
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
       0. /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       1. /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       2. /dev/rdsk/c1t8d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       3. /dev/rdsk/c1t9d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
Specify disk (enter its number): 0
selecting c1t0d0
[disk formatted]
format> partition
partition> print
partition> modify
Select partitioning base:
    0. Current partition table (original)
    1. All Free Hog
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders        Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  1       swap    wu       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  2     backup    wu       0 - 7505       16.86GB    (7506/0/0) 35368272
  3 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  4 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  5 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  6        usr    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  7 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0

Choose base (enter number) [0]? 1
table based on above table[yes]? yes
Free Hog partition[6]? 6
Enter size of partition '0' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 4gb
Enter size of partition '1' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 4gb
Enter size of partition '3' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '4' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '5' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '7' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders        Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0 - 1780        4.00GB    (1781/0/0)  8392072
  1       swap    wu    1781 - 3561        4.00GB    (1781/0/0)  8392072
  2     backup    wu       0 - 7505       16.86GB    (7506/0/0) 35368272
  3 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  4 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  5 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  6        usr    wm    3562 - 7505        8.86GB    (3944/0/0) 18584128
  7 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
 
Okay to make this the current partition table[yes]? yes
Enter table name (remember quotes): "disk0"
Ready to label disk, continue? yes
partition> quit
format> verify
format> quit
Example 12-2 SPARC: Creating Disk Slices and Labeling a Secondary Disk

The following example shows the format utility being used to divide a 18-Gbyte disk into one slice for the /export/home file system.

# format /dev/rdsk/c1*
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
       0. /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       1. /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       2. /dev/rdsk/c1t8d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
       3. /dev/rdsk/c1t9d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/QLGC,[email protected],10000/[email protected],0
Specify disk (enter its number): 1
selecting c1t1d0
[disk formatted]
format> partition
partition> print
partition> modify
Select partitioning base:
    0. Current partition table (original)
    1. All Free Hog
Choose base (enter number) [0]? 1
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders        Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  1       swap    wu       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  2     backup    wu       0 - 7505       16.86GB    (7506/0/0) 35368272
  3 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  4 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  5 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  6        usr    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  7 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0

Do you wish to continue creating a new partition
table based on above table[yes]? y
Free Hog partition[6]? 7
Enter size of partition '0' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '1' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '3' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '4' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '5' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]: 
Enter size of partition '6' [0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]:
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders        Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  1       swap    wu       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  2     backup    wu       0 - 7505       16.86GB    (7506/0/0) 35368272
  3 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  4 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  5 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  6        usr    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
  7 unassigned    wm       0 - 7505       16.86GB    (7506/0/0) 35368272
Okay to make this the current partition table[yes]? yes
Enter table name (remember quotes): "home"
Ready to label disk, continue? y
partition> q
format> verify
format> q
# 

The following example shows how to use the format utility to divide a 1.15 terabyte disk with an EFI label into three slices.

# format
.
.
.
partition> modify
Select partitioning base:
        0. Current partition table (original)
        1. All Free Hog
Choose base (enter number) [0]? 1
Part      Tag    Flag     First Sector          Size          Last Sector
  0       root    wm                 0            0                0    
  1        usr    wm                 0            0                0    
  2 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  3 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  4 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  5 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  6        usr    wm                 0            0                0    
  8   reserved    wm        2576924638         8.00MB           2576941021
Do you wish to continue creating a new partition
table based on above table[yes]? y
Free Hog partition[6]? 4
Enter size of partition 0 [0b, 34e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 
Enter size of partition 1 [0b, 34e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 
Enter size of partition 2 [0b, 34e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 400gb
Enter size of partition 3 [0b, 838860834e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 400gb
Enter size of partition 5 [0b, 1677721634e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 
Enter size of partition 6 [0b, 1677721634e, 0mb, 0gb, 0tb]: 
Part      Tag    Flag     First Sector          Size          Last Sector
  0 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  1 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  2        usr    wm                34       400.00GB           838860833
  3        usr    wm         838860834       400.00GB           1677721633
  4        usr    wm        1677721634       428.77GB           2576924637
  5 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  6 unassigned    wm                 0            0                0    
  8   reserved    wm        2576924638         8.00MB           2576941021
Ready to label disk, continue? yes

partition> q
More Information
After You Create Disk Slices and Label a Disk ...

After you create disk slices and label the disk, you can create file systems on the disk. Go to SPARC: How to Create a UFS File System.

SPARC: How to Create a UFS File System

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.
  2. Create a file system for each slice.
    # newfs /dev/rdsk/cwtxdysz

    where /dev/rdsk/cwtxdysx is the raw device for the file system to be created.

    For more information about the newfs command, see Chapter 18, Creating UFS, TMPFS, and LOFS File Systems (Tasks) or newfs(1M).

  3. Verify the new file system by mounting it.
    # mount /dev/dsk/cwtxdysz /mnt
    # ls 
    lost+found
More Information
After Creating a UFS File System ...

SPARC: How to Install a Boot Block on a System Disk

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.
  2. Install a boot block on the system disk.
    # installboot /usr/platform/`uname -i`/lib/fs/ufs/bootblk
    /dev/rdsk/cwtxdys0
    /usr/platform/`uname -i`/lib/fs /ufs/bootblk

    Is the boot block code.

    /dev/rdsk/cwtxdys0

    Is the raw device of the root (/) file system.

    For more information, see installboot(1M).

  3. Verify that the boot blocks are installed by rebooting the system to run level 3.
    # init 6
Example 12-3 SPARC: Installing a Boot Block on a System Disk

The following example shows how to install the boot block on an UltraTM 10 system.

# installboot /usr/platform/sun4u/lib/fs/ufs/bootblk
/dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0
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