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Samba HowTo Guide
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Example Configuration

In the following section we examine two distinct aspects of Samba locking controls.

Disabling Oplocks

You can disable oplocks on a per-share basis with the following:

[acctdata]
oplocks = False
level2 oplocks = False

The default oplock type is Level1. Level2 oplocks are enabled on a per-share basis in the smb.conf file.

Alternately, you could disable oplocks on a per-file basis within the share:

veto oplock files = /*.mdb/*.MDB/*.dbf/*.DBF/

If you are experiencing problems with oplocks, as apparent from Samba's log entries, you may want to play it safe and disable oplocks and Level2 oplocks.

Disabling Kernel Oplocks

Kernel oplocks is an smb.conf parameter that notifies Samba (if the UNIX kernel has the capability to send a Windows client an oplock break) when a UNIX process is attempting to open the file that is cached. This parameter addresses sharing files between UNIX and Windows with oplocks enabled on the Samba server: the UNIX process can open the file that is Oplocked (cached) by the Windows client and the smbd process will not send an oplock break, which exposes the file to the risk of data corruption. If the UNIX kernel has the ability to send an oplock break, then the kernel oplocks parameter enables Samba to send the oplock break. Kernel oplocks are enabled on a per-server basis in the smb.conf file.

kernel oplocks = yes

The default is no.

Veto oplocks is an smb.conf parameter that identifies specific files for which oplocks are disabled. When a Windows client opens a file that has been configured for veto oplocks, the client will not be granted the oplock, and all operations will be executed on the original file on disk instead of a client-cached file copy. By explicitly identifying files that are shared with UNIX processes and disabling oplocks for those files, the server-wide oplock configuration can be enabled to allow Windows clients to utilize the performance benefit of file caching without the risk of data corruption. Veto oplocks can be enabled on a per-share basis, or globally for the entire server, in the smb.conf file as shown in ???.

Example16.1.Share with Some Files Oplocked

[global]
veto oplock files = /filename.htm/*.txt/
[share_name]
veto oplock files = /*.exe/filename.ext/

oplock break wait time is an smb.conf parameter that adjusts the time interval for Samba to reply to an oplock break request. Samba recommends: “Do not change this parameter unless you have read and understood the Samba oplock code.” Oplock break wait time can only be configured globally in the smb.conf file as shown:

oplock break wait time = 0 (default)

Oplock break contention limit is an smb.conf parameter that limits the response of the Samba server to grant an oplock if the configured number of contending clients reaches the limit specified by the parameter. Samba recommends “Do not change this parameter unless you have read and understood the Samba oplock code.” Oplock break contention limit can be enabled on a per-share basis, or globally for the entire server, in the smb.conf file as shown in ???.

Example16.2.Configuration with Oplock Break Contention Limit

[global]
oplock break contention limit = 2 (default)
[share_name]
oplock break contention limit = 2 (default)

Samba HowTo Guide
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