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Back: C++ Compilers
Forward: Fallback Function Implementations
 
FastBack: Fallback Function Implementations
Up: GNU Autotools in Practice
FastForward: A Simple Shell Builders Library
Top: Autoconf, Automake, and Libtool
Contents: Table of Contents
Index: Index
About: About this document

9.1.4 Function Definitions

As a stylistic convention, the return types for all function definitions should be on a separate line. The main reason for this is that it makes it very easy to find the functions in source file, by looking for a single identifier at the start of a line followed by an open parenthesis:

 
$ egrep '^[_a-zA-Z][_a-zA-Z0-9]*[ \t]*\(' error.c
set_program_name (const char *path)
error (int exit_status, const char *mode, const char *message)
sic_warning (const char *message)
sic_error (const char *message)
sic_fatal (const char *message)

There are emacs lisp functions and various code analysis tools, such as ansi2knr (see section 9.1.6 K&R Compilers), which rely on this formatting convention, too. Even if you don't use those tools yourself, your fellow developers might like to, so it is a good convention to adopt.


This document was generated by Gary V. Vaughan on February, 8 2006 using texi2html

 
 
  Published under the terms of the Open Publication License Design by Interspire