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Databases - Practical PostgreSQL
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Content Inclusion

The heart of LXP's content management is its content inclusion workhorse: the <include> tag. The <include> tag can operate in one of many ways, depending either on the explicit value of the method attribute with which it is initiated, or the implicit context determined by its attributes.

The <include> tag can be used, in its simplest form, to simply include a flat HTML file, such as a standard header, sidebar, and footer. In its more advanced incarnations, the <include> tag can be used to parse token-delimited files by using arbitrary tokens, parse basic XML documents, embed PHP output inline within the LXP document, make direct SQL queries, and, of course, include other LXP documents.

Table 13-1 lists each of the LXP inclusion methods available to the <include> tag. The method in the first column is value that you supply to the <include> tag's method attribute. The alias in the second column describes any alternative names that you can use to invoke the same method. The "Implied by" column shows any attribute values which would imply a method (bypassing the need for an explicit method attribute), and the "Description" column gives a brief description of the method itself.

Table 13-1. LXP inclusion methods

Method

Aliases

Implied by

Description

LXP

.lxp extension ending src attribute

Processes the source file through mod_lxp

flat

Unrecognized extension in src attribute, and no sql or query attribute

Displays a file's literal contents

parsed

Parses a token-delimited file, and breaks it up into accessible <field> values

XML

RSS, RDF

.xml , .rdf or .rss extension at the end of the src attribute

Parses a well-formed XML file, and breaks it up into accessible <field> values

local

Apache

.php , .php3 , or .phtml extension at the end of the src attribute

Displays output of an Apache subrequest with a src attribute describing a system filename

URI

Displays output of an Apache subrequest with a src attribute describing an HTTP URI

SQL

Existence of sql or query attribute

Executes a SQL statement, making query results accessible both as variables, and with the <field> tag

The source of content inclusion is invariably defined in the src attribute of the <include> tag. In most cases this is a system filename, though it may describe a database source or Apache URI request, depending on the method. When you include a file described by a relative path (one that is not explicitly defined from the root of the filesystem), LXP will use the working directory of the LXP document which is performing the inclusion.

Note: To prevent accidental infinite recursion (e.g., including a file that includes itself), LXP documents may only include to the depth specified in the lxp.conf file's MaxIncludeDepth directive (see the Section called Nuts and Bolts: Configuring lxp.conf "). The default maximum include depth is 15.

Databases - Practical PostgreSQL
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