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8.7 The value Function

The value function provides a way for you to use the value of a variable without having it expanded. Please note that this does not undo expansions which have already occurred; for example if you create a simply expanded variable its value is expanded during the definition; in that case the value function will return the same result as using the variable directly.

The syntax of the value function is:

 
$(value variable)

Note that variable is the name of a variable; not a reference to that variable. Therefore you would not normally use a `$' or parentheses when writing it. (You can, however, use a variable reference in the name if you want the name not to be a constant.)

The result of this function is a string containing the value of variable, without any expansion occurring. For example, in this makefile:

 
FOO = $PATH

all:
        @echo $(FOO)
        @echo $(value FOO)

The first output line would be ATH, since the "$P" would be expanded as a make variable, while the second output line would be the current value of your $PATH environment variable, since the value function avoided the expansion.

The value function is most often used in conjunction with the eval function (see section 8.8 The eval Function).



 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire