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Ruby Programming
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An Example

The following example, using Microsoft Excel, illustrates most of these concepts. First, we create a new WIN32OLE object attached to Excel and set some cell values. Next we select a range of cells and create a chart. We set the Type property in the excelchart object to make it a 3D chart. Next we'll loop through and change the chart rotation, 10� at a time. We'll add a few charts, and we'll use each to step through and print them out. Finally, we'll close down the Excel application and exit.

require 'win32ole'

# -4100 is the value for the Excel constant xl3DColumn. ChartTypeVal = -4100;

# Creates OLE object to Excel excel = WIN32OLE.new("excel.application")

# Create and rotate the chart

excel['Visible'] = TRUE; workbook = excel.Workbooks.Add(); excel.Range("a1")['Value'] = 3; excel.Range("a2")['Value'] = 2; excel.Range("a3")['Value'] = 1; excel.Range("a1:a3").Select(); excelchart = workbook.Charts.Add(); excelchart['Type'] = ChartTypeVal;

30.step(180, 10) do |rot|     excelchart['Rotation'] = rot end

excelchart2 = workbook.Charts.Add(); excelchart3 = workbook.Charts.Add();

charts = workbook.Charts charts.each { |i| puts i }

excel.ActiveWorkbook.Close(0); excel.Quit();
Ruby Programming
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  Published under the terms of the Open Publication License Design by Interspire