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openSUSE 11.1 Reference Guide
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17.1 The /dev Directory

The device nodes in the /dev directory provide access to the corresponding kernel devices. With udev, the /dev directory reflects the current state of the kernel. Every kernel device has one corresponding device file. If a device is disconnected from the system, the device node is removed.

The content of the /dev directory is kept on a temporary file system and all files are created from scratch at every system start-up. Manually created or changed files intentionally do not survive a reboot. Static files and directories that should always be present in the /dev directory regardless of the state of the corresponding kernel device can be placed in the /lib/udev/devices directory. At system start-up, the contents of that directory is copied to the /dev directory with the same ownership and permissions as the files in /lib/udev/devices.

openSUSE 11.1 Reference Guide
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