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System Administration Guide: Security Services
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Determining Your Assigned Privileges

When a user is directly assigned privileges, the privileges are in effect in every shell. When a user is not directly assigned privileges, then the user must open a profile shell. For example, when commands with assigned privileges are in a rights profile that is in the user's list of rights profiles, then the user must execute the command in a profile shell.

How to Determine the Privileges That You Have Been Directly Assigned

The following procedure shows how to determine if you have been directly assigned privileges.


Caution - Inappropriate use of directly assigned privileges can result in unintentional breaches of security. For a discussion, see Security Considerations When Directly Assigning Security Attributes.


  1. List the privileges that your processes can use.

    See How to Determine the Privileges on a Process for the procedure.

  2. Invoke actions and run commands in any shell.

    The privileges that are listed in the effective set are in effect throughout your session. If you have been directly assigned privileges in addition to the basic set, the privileges are listed in the effective set.

Example 11-9 Determining Your Directly-Assigned Privileges

If you have been directly assigned privileges, then your basic set contains more than the default basic set. In this example, the user always has access to the proc_clock_highres privilege.

% /usr/ucb/whoami
jdoe
% ppriv -v $$
1800:   pfksh
flags = <none>
        E: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session
        I: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session
        P: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session
        L: cpc_cpu,dtrace_kernel,dtrace_proc,dtrace_user,…,sys_time
% ppriv -vl proc_clock_highres
        Allows a process to use high resolution timers.
Example 11-10 Determining a Role's Directly-Assigned Privileges

Roles use an administrative shell, or profile shell. Users who assume a role can use the role's shell to list the privileges that have been directly assigned to the role. In the following example, the role realtime has been directly assigned privileges to handle date and time programs.

% su - realtime
Password: <Type realtime password>
$ /usr/ucb/whoami
realtime
$ ppriv -v $$
1600:   pfksh
flags = <none>
        E: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session,sys_time
        I: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session,sys_time
        P: file_link_any,…,proc_clock_highres,proc_session,sys_time
        L: cpc_cpu,dtrace_kernel,dtrace_proc,dtrace_user,…,sys_time

How to Determine the Privileged Commands That You Can Run

When a user is not directly assigned privileges, then the user gets access to privileged commands through a rights profile. Commands in a rights profile must be executed in a profile shell.

Before You Begin

The user or role who authenticates to the Solaris Management Console must have the solaris.admin.usermgr.read authorization. The Basic Solaris User rights profile includes this authorization.

  1. Determine the rights profiles that you have been assigned.
    $ /usr/sadm/bin/smuser list -- -n username -l
    Authenticating as user: admin
    … Please enter a string value for: password :: 
    …
    User name:      username
    User ID (UID):  130
    Primary group:  staff
    Secondary groups: 
    Comment: object mgt jobs
    Login Shell: /bin/sh
    Home dir server: system
    Home directory: /export/home/username
    AutoHome setup: True
    Mail server: system
    Rights: Object Access Management
    Assigned Roles:
  2. Locate the line that begins with “Rights:”.

    The “Rights” line lists the names of the rights profiles that have been directly assigned to you.

  3. Find the names of the rights profiles in the exec_attr database.
    $ cd /etc/security
    $ grep "Object Access Management" exec_attr 
    Object Access Management:solaris:cmd:::/usr/bin/chgrp:privs=file_chown
    Object Access Management:solaris:cmd:::/usr/bin/chown:privs=file_chown
    Object Access Management:suser:cmd:::/usr/bin/chgrp:euid=0
    Object Access Management:suser:cmd:::/usr/bin/chmod:euid=0
    …

    The commands with added privileges are listed at the end of solaris policy entries.

  4. Type the commands that require privileges in a profile shell.

    When the commands are typed in a regular shell, the commands do not run with privilege, and do not succeed.

    % pfsh
    $
Example 11-11 Running Privileged Commands in a Profile Shell

In the following example, the user jdoe cannot change the group permissions on a file from his regular shell. However, jdoe can change the permissions when typing the command in a profile shell.

% whoami
jdoe
% ls -l useful.script
-rwxr-xr-- 1 nodoe eng 262 Apr 2 10:52 useful.script
chgrp staff useful.script
chgrp: useful.script: Not owner
% pfksh
$ /usr/ucb/whoami
jdoe
$ chgrp staff useful.script
$ chown jdoe useful.script
$ ls -l useful.script
-rwxr-xr-- 1 jdoe staff 262 Apr 2 10:53 useful.script

How to Determine the Privileged Commands That a Role Can Run

A role gets access to privileged commands through a rights profile that contains commands with assigned privileges. The most secure way to provide a user with access to privileged commands is to assign a role to them. After assuming the role, the user can execute all the privileged commands that are included in the rights profiles for that role.

Before You Begin

The user or role who authenticates to the Solaris Management Console must have the solaris.admin.usermgr.read authorization. The Basic Solaris User rights profile includes this authorization.

  1. Determine the roles that you can assume.
    $ /usr/sadm/bin/smuser list -- -n username -l
    Authenticating as user: primadmin
    …
    User name:      username
    User ID (UID):  110
    Primary group:  staff
    Secondary groups: 
    Comment: Has admin roles
    Login Shell: /bin/sh
    …
    Rights: 
    Assigned Roles: primadmin, admin
  2. Locate the line that begins with “Assigned Roles:”.

    The “Assigned Roles” line lists the roles that you can assume.

  3. Determine the rights profiles that are included in one of your roles.
    $ /usr/sadm/bin/smuser list -- -n admin -l
    Authenticating as user: primadmin
    …
    User name:      admin
    User ID (UID):  101
    Primary group:  sysadmin
    Secondary groups:
    Comment: system administrator
    Login Shell: /bin/pfksh
    …
    Rights: System Administrator
    Assigned Roles:
  4. Locate the names of the rights profiles for the role in the “Rights:” line.
  5. Find the rights profiles in the prof_attr database.

    Because the System Administrator profile is a collection of profiles, you need to list the profiles in the System Administrator profile.

    $ cd /etc/security
    $ grep "System Administrator" prof_attr 
    System Administrator:::Can perform most non-security administrative
    tasks:profiles=Audit Review,Printer Management,Cron Management,
    Device Management,File System Management,Mail Management,Maintenance
    and Repair,Media Backup,Media Restore,Name Service Management,Network
    Management,Object Access Management,Process Management,Software
    Installation,User Management,All;help=RtSysAdmin.html
  6. For each rights profile, find the rights profiles in the exec_attr database.

    For example, the Network Management profile is a supplementary profile of the System Administrator profile. The Network Management profile includes a number of privileged commands.

    $ cd /etc/security
    $ grep "Network Management" exec_attr 
    Network Management:solaris:cmd:::/usr/sbin/ifconfig:privs=sys_net_config
    Network Management:solaris:cmd:::/usr/sbin/route:privs=sys_net_config

    The commands and their assigned privileges are the final two fields of solaris policy entries. You can run these commands in the profile shell of your role.

Example 11-12 Running the Privileged Commands in Your Role

When a user assumes a role, the shell becomes a profile shell. Therefore, the commands are executed with the privileges that were assigned to the commands. In the following example, the admin role can change the permissions on the useful.script file.

% whoami
jdoe
% ls -l useful.script
-rwxr-xr-- 1 elsee eng 262 Apr 2 10:52 useful.script
chgrp admin useful.script
chgrp: useful.script: Not owner
% su - admin
Password: <Type admin password>
$ /usr/ucb/whoami
admin
$ chgrp admin useful.script
$ chown admin useful.script
$ ls -l useful.script
-rwxr-xr-- 1 admin admin 262 Apr 2 10:53 useful.script
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