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System Administration Guide: Network Services
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Administering the Caching of Web Pages (Tasks)

The following sections cover the procedures to enable or disable parts of the service.

How to Enable Caching of Web Pages

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Register the interfaces.

    Type the names of each of the physical interfaces in the /etc/nca/nca.if file. See the nca.if(4) man page for more information.

    # cat /etc/nca/nca.if
    hme0
    hme1

    Each interface must have an accompanying hostname.interface-name file and an entry in /etc/hosts file for the contents of hostname.interface-name. To start the NCA feature on all interfaces, place an asterisk, *, in the nca.if file.

  3. Enable the ncakmod kernel module.

    Change the status entry in /etc/nca/ncakmod.conf to enabled.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncakmod.conf
    #
    # NCA Kernel Module Configuration File
    #
    status=enabled
    httpd_door_path=/var/run/nca_httpd_1.door
    nca_active=disabled

    See the ncakmod.conf(4) man page for more information.

  4. (Optional) Enable NCA logging.

    Change the status entry in /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf to enabled.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf
    #
    # NCA Logging Configuration File
    #
    status=enabled
    logd_path_name="/var/nca/log"
    logd_file_size=1000000

    You can change the location of the log file by changing the path that is indicated by the logd_path_name entry. The log file can be a raw device or a file. See the following examples for samples of NCA log file paths. See the ncalogd.conf(4) man page for more information about the configuration file.

  5. (Optional) Define ports for multiple instance support.

    Add the port numbers in the /etc/nca/ncaport.conf file. This entry causes NCA to monitor port 80 on all configured IP addresses.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncaport.conf
    #
    # NCA Kernel Module Port Configuration File
    #
      .
      .
    ncaport=*/80
  6. For x86 only: Increase the virtual memory size.

    Use the eeprom command to set the kernelbase of the system.

    # eeprom kernelbase=0x90000000
    # eeprom kernelbase
    kernelbase=0x90000000

    The second command verifies that the parameter has been set.


    Note - By setting the kernelbase, you reduce the amount of virtual memory that user processes can use to less than 3 Gbytes. This restriction means that the system is not ABI compliant. When the system boots, the console displays a message that warns you about noncompliance. Most programs do not actually need the full 3–Gbyte virtual address space. If you have a program that needs more than 3 Gbytes, you need to run the program on a system that does not have NCA enabled.


  7. Reboot the server.
Example 2-1 Using a Raw Device as the NCA Log File

The logd_path_name string in ncalogd.conf can define a raw device as the place to store the NCA log file. The advantage to using a raw device is that the service can run faster because the overhead in accessing a raw device is less.

The NCA service tests any raw device that is listed in the file to ensure that no file system is in place. This test ensures that no active file systems are accidentally written over.

To prevent this test from finding a file system, run the following command. This command destroys part of the file system on any disk partition that had been configured as a file system. In this example, /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7 is the raw device that has an old file system in place.

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7 bs=1024 count=1

After running dd, you can then add the raw device to the ncalogd.conf file.

# cat /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf
#
# NCA Logging Configuration File
#
status=enabled
logd_path_name="/dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7"
logd_file_size=1000000
Example 2-2 Using Multiple Files for NCA Logging

The logd_path_name string in ncalogd.conf can define multiple targets as the place to store the NCA log file. The second file is used when the first file is full. The following example shows how to select to write to the /var/nca/log file first and then use a raw partition.

# cat /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf
#
# NCA Logging Configuration File
#
status=enabled
logd_path_name="/var/nca/log /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7"
logd_file_size=1000000

How to Disable Caching of Web Pages

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Disable the ncakmod kernel module.

    Change the status entry in /etc/nca/ncakmod.conf to disabled.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncakmod.conf
    # NCA Kernel Module Configuration File
    #
    status=disabled
    httpd_door_path=/var/run/nca_httpd_1.door
    nca_active=disabled

    See the ncakmod.conf(4) man page for more information.

  3. Disable NCA logging.

    Change the status entry in /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf to disabled.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf
    #
    # NCA Logging Configuration File
    #
    status=disabled
    logd_path_name="/var/nca/log"
    logd_file_size=1000000

    See the ncalogd.conf(4) man page for more information.

  4. Reboot the server.

How to Enable or Disable NCA Logging

NCA logging can be turned on or turned off, as needed, after NCA has been enabled. See How to Enable Caching of Web Pages for more information.

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Change NCA logging.

    To permanently disable logging, you need to change the status in /etc/nca/ncalogd.conf to disabled and reboot the system. See the ncalogd.conf(4) man page for more information.

    1. Stop logging.
      # /etc/init.d/ncalogd stop
    2. Start logging.
      # /etc/init.d/ncalogd start

How to Load the Socket Utility Library for NCA

Follow this process only if your web server does not provide native support of the AF_NCA socket.

In the startup script for the web server, add a line that causes the library to be preloaded. The line should resemble the following:

LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/ncad_addr.so /usr/bin/httpd

How to Add a New Port to the NCA Service

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Add a new port.

    Add a new port entry to /etc/nca/ncaport.conf. This example adds port 8888 on IP address 192.168.84.71. See ncaport.conf(4) for more information.

    # cat /etc/nca/ncaport.conf
    #
    # NCA Kernel Module Port Configuration File
    #
      .
      .
    ncaport=*/80
    ncaport=192.168.84.71/8888
  3. Start a new web instance.

    An address needs to be in the file that contains the NCA port configurations before a web server can use the address for NCA. If the web server is running, it must be restarted after the new address is defined.

How to Configure an Apache 2.0 Web Server to Use the SSL Kernel Proxy

This procedure should be used to improve the performance of SSL packet process on an Apache 2.0 web server.

Before You Begin

The following procedure requires that an Apache 2.0 web server has been installed and configured. The Apache 2.0 web server is included in the Solaris 10 release.

To use the SSL kernel proxy, the server private key and the server certificate need to exist in a single file. If only the SSLCertificateFile parameter is specified in the ssl.conf file, then the specified file can be used directly for kernel SSL. If the SSLCertificateKeyFile parameter is also specified, then the certificate file and the private key file need to be combined. One way to combine the certificate and the key file is to run the following command:

# cat cert.pem key.pem >cert-and-key.pem
  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration The ksslcfg command is included in the Network Security profile.

  2. Stop the web server.

    This command will stop the web server on a system in which the server is configured to run using SMF.

    # svcadm disable svc:/network/https:apache2

    If the service has not be converted yet, stop the service with this command syntax: /usr/apache2/bin/apachectl stop

  3. Determine what parameters to use with the ksslcfg command.

    All of the options are listed in the ksslcfg(1M) man page. The parameters that you must have information for are:

    • key-format – Used with the -f option to define the certificate and key format. For the SSL kernel proxy the value should be either pem or pkcs12.

    • key-and-certificate-file – Used with the -i option to set the location of the file that stores to server key and the certificate.

    • password-file – Used with the -p option to select the location of the file that includes the password used to encrypt the private key. This password is used to allow unattended reboots. The permissions on the file should be 0400.

    • proxy-port – Used with the -x option to set the SSL proxy port. Select a different port than the standard port 80.

    • ssl-port – Selects the port of the server application. Normally this is set to 443.


    Note - The ssl-port and the proxy-port values can not be configured for NCA since these ports are used exclusively by the SSL kernel proxy. Usually, port 80 is used for NCA, port 8080 for the proxy-port and 443 for the ssl-port


  4. Create the service instance.

    The ksslcfg command to specify the SSL proxy port and associated parameters.

    ksslcfg create -f key-format -i key-and-certificate-file -p password-file -x proxy-port ssl-port
  5. Verify that the instance was created properly.

    The service state reported by the following command should be “online”.

    # svcs svc:/network/ssl/proxy
  6. Configure the web server to listen on the SSL proxy port.

    Edit the /etc/apache2/http.conf file and add a line to define the SSL proxy port. If you use the servers IP address, then the web server will only listen on that interface. The line should look like:

    Listen 0.0.0.0:proxy-port
  7. Set an SMF dependency for the web server.

    The web server should only be started after the SSL kernel proxy instance. The following commands establish that dependency.

    # svccfg -s svc:/network/https:apache2
    svc:/network/https:apache2> addpg kssl dependency
    svc:/network/https:apache2> setprop kssl/entities = fmri:svc:/network/ssl/proxy:kssl-INADDR_ANY-443
    svc:/network/https:apache2> setprop kssl/grouping = astring: require_all
    svc:/network/https:apache2> setprop kssl/restart_on = astring: refresh
    svc:/network/https:apache2> setprop kssl/type = astring: service
    svc:/network/https:apache2> end
  8. Enable the web server.
    # svcadm enable svc:/network/https:apache2

    If the service is not started using SMF, use the following command: /usr/apache2/bin/apachectl startssl

Example 2-3 Configuring an Apache 2.0 Web Server to Use the SSL Kernel Proxy

The following command creates an instance using the pem key format.

# ksslcfg create -f pem -i cert-and-key.pem -p file -x 8080 443

How to Configure a Sun Java System Web Server to Use the SSL Kernel Proxy

This procedure should be used to improve the performance of SSL packet process on a Sun Java System Web Server. See the Sun Java System Web Server 6.1 SP4 Administrator’s Guide for information about this web server.

Before You Begin

The following procedure requires that a Sun Java System Web Server has been installed and configured.

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration The ksslcfg command is included in the Network Security profile.

  2. Stop the web server.

    Use the administrator web interface to stop the server. See Starting and Stopping the Server in the Sun Java System Web Server 6.1 SP4 Administrator’s Guidefor more information.

  3. Determine what parameters to use with the ksslcfg command.

    All of the options are listed in the ksslcfg(1M) man page. The parameters that you must have information for are:

    • key-format – Used with the -f option to define the certificate and key format.

    • token-label – Used with the -T option to specify the PKCS#11 token.

    • certificate-label – Used with the -C option to select the label in the certificate object in the PKCS#11 token

    • password-file – Used with the -p option to select the location of the file that includes the password used to login the user to the PKCS#11 token used by the web server.. This password is used to allow unattended reboots. The permissions on the file should be 0400.

    • proxy-port– Used with the -x option to set the SSL proxy port. Select a different port than the standard port 80.

    • ssl-port – Defines the port of the server application. This value is set in the server.xml file. Normally this value is set to 443.


    Note - The ssl-port and the proxy-port values can not be configured for NCA since these ports are used exclusively by the SSL kernel proxy. Usually, port 80 is used for NCA, port 8080 for the proxy-port and 443 for the ssl-port


  4. Create the service instance.

    The ksslcfg command to specify the SSL proxy port and associated parameters.

    ksslcfg create -f key-format -T PKCS#11-token -C certificate-label -p password-file -x proxy-port ssl-port
  5. Verify that the instance was created properly.

    The service state reported by the following command should be “online”.

    # svcs svc:/network/ssl/proxy
  6. Configure the web server to listen on the SSL proxy port.

    See Adding and Editing Listen Sockets in the Sun Java System Web Server 6.1 SP4 Administrator’s Guide for more information.

  7. Start the web server.
Example 2-4 Configuring a Sun Java System Web Server to Use the SSL Kernel Proxy

The following command creates an instance using the pkcs11 key format.

# ksslcfg create -f pkcs11 -T "NSS Internal PKCS #11 Module" -C "Server-Cert" -p file -x 8080 443

Using the SSL Kernel Proxy in Zones

The SSL Kernel Proxy works in zones with the following limitations:

  • All of the kernel SSL administration must be done from the global zone. The global zone administrator needs access to the local zone certificate and key files. The local zone web server can be started once the service instance is configured using the ksslcfg command in the global zone.

  • A specific host name or IP address must be specified when running the ksslcfg command to configure the instance. In particular, the instance can not use INADDR_ANY.

Example 2-5 Configuring an Apache Web Server in a Local Zone to Use the SSL Kernel Proxy

In the local zone, first stop the web server. In the global zone do all of the steps to configure the service. To create a instance for a local zone called apache-zone, use the following command:

# ksslcfg create -f pem -i /zone/apache-zone/root/keypair.pem -p /zone/apache-zone/root/pass \ -x 8080 apache-zone 443

In the local zone, run the following command to enable the service instance:

# svcadm enable svc:/network/https:apache2
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