Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

System Administration Guide: Network Services
Previous Next

Planning Your Mail System

The following list describes some concerns that should be part of your planning process.

  • Determine the type of mail configuration that meets your requirements. This section describes two basic types of mail configuration and briefly lists what you need to set up each configuration. If you need to set up a new mail system or if you are expanding an existing one, you might find this section useful. Local Mail Only describes the first configuration type, and Local Mail and a Remote Connection describes the second type.

  • As necessary, choose the systems that are to act as mail servers, mail hosts, and mail gateways.

  • Make a list of all the mail clients for which you are providing service and include the location of their mailboxes. This list can help you when you are ready to create mail aliases for your users.

  • Decide how to update aliases and forward mail messages. You might set up an aliases mailbox as a place for users to send requests for mail forwarding. Users could also use this mailbox to send requests for changes to their default mail alias. If your system uses NIS or NIS+, you can administer mail forwarding, rather than requiring users to manage mail forwarding. Administering Mail Alias Files (Task Map) provides a list of tasks that are related to aliasing. Administering .forward Files (Task Map) provides a list of tasks that are related to managing .forward files.

After you have completed the planning process, set up the systems on your site to perform the functions that are described in Setting Up Mail Services (Task Map). For other task information, refer to Task Map for Mail Services.

Local Mail Only

The simplest mail configuration, as shown in Figure 13-1, is two or more workstations that are connected to one mail host. Mail is completely local. All the clients store mail on their local disks, and the clients act as mail servers. Mail addresses are parsed by using the /etc/mail/aliases files.

Figure 13-1 Local Mail Configuration
Diagram shows the dependencies of a mail host to mail clients.

To set up this kind of mail configuration, you need the following.

  • The default /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file, which requires no editing, on each mail client system.

  • A server that is designated as the mail host. If you are running NIS or NIS+, you can make this designation by adding mailhost.domain-name to the /etc/hosts file on the mail host. If you are running another name service, such as DNS or LDAP, you must provide additional information in the /etc/hosts file. See How to Set Up a Mail Host.

  • If you are using a name service other than NIS or NIS+, you need matching /etc/mail/aliases files on any system that has a local mailbox.

  • Enough space in /var/mail on each mail client system to hold the mailboxes.

For task information about setting up your mail service, refer to Setting Up Mail Services. If you are looking for a particular procedure that is related to setting up your mail service, refer to Setting Up Mail Services (Task Map).

Local Mail and a Remote Connection

The most common mail configuration in a small network is shown in Figure 13-2. One system includes the mail server, the mail host, and the mail gateway that provides the remote connection. Mail is distributed by using the /etc/mail/aliases files on the mail gateway. No name service is required.

Figure 13-2 Local Mail Configuration With a UUCP Connection
Diagram shows the dependencies of mail clients to a mail gateway.

In this configuration, you can assume that the mail clients mount their mail files from /var/mail on the mail host. To set up this kind of mail configuration, you need the following.

  • The default /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file on each mail client system. This file does not require any editing.

  • A server that is designated as the mail host. If you are running NIS or NIS+, you can make this designation by adding mailhost.domain-name to the /etc/hosts file on the mail host. If you are running another name service, such as DNS or LDAP, you must provide additional information in the /etc/hosts file. See How to Set Up a Mail Host.

  • If you are using a name service other than NIS or NIS+, you need matching /etc/mail/aliases files on any system that has a local mailbox.

  • Enough space in /var/mail on the mail server to hold the client mailboxes.

For task information about setting up your mail service, refer to Setting Up Mail Services. If you are looking for a particular procedure that is related to setting up your mail service, refer to Setting Up Mail Services (Task Map).

Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire