Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Solaris Express Installation Guide: Custom JumpStart and Advanced Installations
Previous Next

Creating Disk Configuration Files

This section describes how to create single-disk and multiple-disk configuration files. Disk configuration files enable you to use pfinstall(1M) from a single system to test profiles against different disk configurations.

SPARC: To Create a Disk Configuration File

  1. Locate a SPARC based system with a disk you want to test.
  2. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  3. Create a single–disk configuration file by redirecting the output of the prtvtoc(1M) command to a file.
    # prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/device_name >disk_config_file
    /dev/rdsk/device_name

    The device name of the system's disk. device_name must be in the form cwtxdys2 or cxdys2.

    disk_config_file

    The name of the disk configuration file.

  4. Determine if you are testing the installation of Solaris software on multiple disks.
    • If no, stop. You are finished.

    • If yes, concatenate the single–disk configuration files and save the output in a new file.

      # cat disk_file1 disk_file2 >multi_disk_config

      The new file becomes the multiple-disk configuration file, as in the following example.

      # cat 104_disk2 104_disk3 104_disk5 >multi_disk_test
  5. Determine if the target numbers in the disk device names are unique in the multiple-disk configuration file that you created in the previous step.
    • If yes, stop. You are finished.

    • If no, open the file with a text editor and make the target numbers unique in the disk device names.

      For example, assume that the file contains the same target number, t0, for different disk device names, as shown here.

      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map
      ...
      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map

      Change the second target number to t2, as shown here:

      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map
      ...
      * /dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s2 partition map

SPARC: Disk Configuration File Example

The following example shows how to create a single–disk configuration file, 104_test, on a SPARC based system with a 104-Mbyte disk.

Example 4-8 SPARC: Creating a Disk Configuration File

You redirect the output of the prtvtoc command to a single–disk configuration file that is named 104_test:

# prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/c0t3d0s2 >104_test

The contents of the 104_test file resemble the following:

* /dev/rdsk/c0t3d0s2 partition map
*
* Dimensions:
*     512 bytes/sector
*      72 sectors/track
*      14 tracks/cylinder
*    1008 sectors/cylinder
*    2038 cylinders*    2036 accessible cylinders
* Flags:
*   1: unmountable
*  10: read-only
*
*                          First     Sector    Last
* Partition  Tag  Flags    Sector     Count    Sector  Mount Directory
       1      2    00          0     164304   164303   /
       2      5    00          0    2052288  2052287  
       3      0    00     164304     823536   987839   /disk2/b298
       5      0    00     987840     614880  1602719   /install/298/sparc/work
       7      0    00    1602720     449568  2052287   /space

You have created disk configuration files for a SPARC based system. Testing a Profile contains information about using disk configuration files to test profiles.

x86: To Create a Disk Configuration File

  1. Locate an x86 based system that contains a disk that you are testing.
  2. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  3. Create part of the single-disk configuration file by saving the output of the fdisk(1M) command in a file.
    # fdisk -R -W disk_config_file -h /dev/rdsk/device_name
    disk_config_file

    The name of a disk configuration file.

    /dev/rdsk/device_name

    The device name of the fdisk layout of the entire disk. device_name must be in the form cwtxdys0 or cxdys0.

  4. Append the output of the prtvtoc(1M) command to the disk configuration file:
    # prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/device_name >>disk_config
    /dev/rdsk/device_name

    The device name of the system's disk. device_name must be in the form cwtxdys2 or cxdys2.

    disk_config

    The name of the disk configuration file.

  5. Determine if you are testing the installation of Solaris software on multiple disks.
    • If no, stop. You are finished.

    • If yes, concatenate the single-disk configuration files and save the output in a new file.

      # cat disk_file1 disk_file2 >multi_disk_config

      The new file becomes the multiple-disk configuration file, as in the following example.

      # cat 104_disk2 104_disk3 104_disk5 >multi_disk_test
  6. Determine if the target numbers in the disk device names are unique in the multiple-disk configuration file that you created in the previous step.
    • If yes, stop. You are finished.

    • If no, open the file with a text editor and make the target numbers unique.

      For example, the file might contain the same target number, t0, for different disk device names as shown here:

      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map
      ...
      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map

      Change the second target number to t2, as shown here:

      * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map
      ...
      * /dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s2 partition map

x86: Disk Configuration File Example

The following example shows how to create a single-disk configuration file, 500_test, on an x86 based system that contains a 500-Mbyte disk.

Example 4-9 x86: Creating a Disk Configuration File

First, you save the output of the fdisk command to a file that is named 500_test:

# fdisk -R -W 500_test -h /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0p0

The 500_test file looks like the following:

 * /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0p0 default fdisk table
* Dimensions:
*     512 bytes/sector
*      94 sectors/track
*      15 tracks/cylinder
*    1455 cylinders
*
*  HBA Dimensions:
*     512 bytes/sector
*      94 sectors/track
*      15 tracks/cylinder
*    1455 cylinders
*
* systid:
*  1:    DOSOS12
*  2:    PCIXOS
*  4:    DOSOS16
*  5:    EXTDOS
*  6:    DOSBIG
*  86:   DOSDATA
*  98:   OTHEROS
*  99:   UNIXOS
* 130:   SUNIXOS
*
* Id  Act Bhead Bsect   Bcyl  Ehead  Esect  Ecyl Rsect  Numsect
 130  128 44    3       0     46    30     1001 1410   2050140

Second, you append the output of the prtvtoc command to the 500_test file:

# prtvtoc /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 >>500_test

The 500_test file is now a complete disk configuration file:

* /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0p0 default fdisk table    
* Dimensions:
*     512 bytes/sector
*      94 sectors/track
*      15 tracks/cylinder
*    1455 cylinders
*
*  HBA Dimensions:
*     512 bytes/sector
*      94 sectors/track
*      15 tracks/cylinder
*    1455 cylinders
*
* systid:
*  1:    DOSOS12
*  2:    PCIXOS
*  4:    DOSOS16
*  5:    EXTDOS
*  6:    DOSBIG
*  86:   DOSDATA
*  98:   OTHEROS
*  99:   UNIXOS
*  130:  SUNIXOS
*
* Id  Act Bhead Bsect Bcyl  Ehead  Esec  Ecyl Rsect  Numsect
 130  128 44    3     0     46    30    1001 1410   2050140
* /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 partition map
*
* Dimensions:
*      512 bytes/sector
*       94 sectors/track
*       15 tracks/cylinder
*     1110 sectors/cylinder
*     1454 cylinders
*     1452 accessible cylinders
*
* Flags:
*   1: unmountable
*  10: read-only
*                          First    Sector    Last
* Partition  Tag  Flags    Sector     Count    Sector  Mount Directory
       2      5    01       1410   2045910   2047319
       7      6    00       4230   2043090   2047319  /space
       8      1    01          0      1410     1409
       9      9    01       1410      2820     422987

You have created disk configuration files for an x86 based system. Testing a Profile contains information about using disk configuration files to test profiles.

Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire