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System Administration Guide: Devices and File Systems
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Identifying Disks on a System

Use the format utility to discover the types of disks that are connected to a system. You can also use the format utility to verify that a disk is known to the system. For detailed information on using the format utility, see Chapter 16, The format Utility (Reference).

How to Identify the Disks on a System

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Identify the disks that are recognized on the system by using the format utility.
    # format

    The format utility displays a list of disks that it recognizes under AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS.

Example 11-1 Identifying the Disks on a System

The following example shows format command output is from a system with one disk.

# format
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
 0. c0t1d0 <FUJITSU  MAN3367M SUN36G  1804 43d671f>
    /[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0

The output associates a disk's physical and logical device name to the disk's marketing name, which appears in angle brackets <>. See the example below. This method is an easy way to identify which logical device names represent the disks that are connected to your system. For a description of logical and physical device names, see Device Naming Conventions.

The following example uses a wildcard to display the four disks that are connected to a second controller.

# format /dev/rdsk/c2*
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
       0. /dev/rdsk/c2t10d0s0 <SUN9.0G cyl 4924 alt 2 hd 27 sec 133>
          /[email protected],0/SUNW,[email protected],8800000/[email protected],0
       1. /dev/rdsk/c2t11d0s0 <SUN9.0G cyl 4924 alt 2 hd 27 sec 133>
          /[email protected],0/SUNW,[email protected],8800000/[email protected],0
       2. /dev/rdsk/c2t14d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/SUNW,[email protected],8800000/[email protected],0
       3. /dev/rdsk/c2t15d0s0 <SUN18G cyl 7506 alt 2 hd 19 sec 248>
          /[email protected],0/SUNW,[email protected],8800000/[email protected],0
Specify disk (enter its number): 

The following example shows how to identify the disks on a SPARC based system.

# format
0. c0t1d0 <FUJITSU  MAN3367M SUN36G  1804 43d671f>
   /[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
Specify disk (enter its number): 

The output identifies that disk 0 (target 1) is connected to the second SCSI host adapter ([email protected]), which is connected to the second PCI interface (/[email protected]/[email protected],1...). The output also associates both the physical and logical device name to the disk's marketing name, SUN36G.

The following example shows how to identify the disks on an x86 based system.

# format
AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
 0. c0d0 <DEFAULT cyl 615 alt 2 hd 64 sec 63>
     /[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
 1. c0d1 <DEFAULT cyl 522 alt 2 hd 32 sec 63>
     /[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
 2. c1d0 <DEFAULT cyl 817 alt 2 hd 256 sec 63>
     /[email protected],0/[email protected],1/[email protected]/[email protected],0
Specify disk (enter its number):  

The output shows that disk 0 is connected to the first PCI host adapter ([email protected].), which is connected to the ATA interface (ata...). The format output on an x86 based system does not identify disks by their marketing names.

More Information
If the format Utility Does Not Recognize a Disk ...
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