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Samba HowTo Guide
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Windows Drivers, GDI, and EMF

In Windows OS, the format conversion job is done by the printer drivers. On MS Windows OS platforms all application programmers have at their disposal a built-in API, the graphical device interface (GDI), as part and parcel of the OS itself to base themselves on. This GDI core is used as one common unified ground for all Windows programs to draw pictures, fonts, and documents on screen as well as on paper (print). Therefore, printer driver developers can standardize on a well-defined GDI output for their own driver input. Achieving WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) is relatively easy, because the on-screen graphic primitives, as well as the on-paper drawn objects, come from one common source. This source, the GDI, often produces a file format called Enhanced MetaFile (EMF). The EMF is processed by the printer driver and converted to the printer-specific file format.

Samba HowTo Guide
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