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Samba HowTo Guide
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Advanced Intelligent Printing with PostScript Driver Download

We now know how to set up a “dump” print server, that is, a server that spools print jobs “raw”, leaving the print data untouched.

You might need to set up CUPS in a smarter way. The reasons could be manifold:

  • Maybe your boss wants to get monthly statistics: Which printer did how many pages? What was the average data size of a job? What was the average print run per day? What are the typical hourly peaks in printing? Which department prints how much?

  • Maybe you are asked to set up a print quota system: Users should not be able to print more jobs once they have surpassed a given limit per period.

  • Maybe your previous network printing setup is a mess and must be re-organized from a clean beginning.

  • Maybe you are experiencing too many “blue screens” originating from poorly debugged printer drivers running in NT “kernel mode”?

These goals cannot be achieved by a raw print server. To build a server meeting these requirements, you'll first need to learn how CUPS works and how you can enable its features.

What follows is the comparison of some fundamental concepts for Windows and UNIX printing, then a description of the CUPS filtering system, how it works, and how you can tweak it.

Samba HowTo Guide
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