Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Samba HowTo Guide
Prev Home Next

Features and Benefits

Standalone servers can be as secure or as insecure as needs dictate. They can have simple or complex configurations. Above all, despite the hoopla about domain security, they remain a common installation.

If all that is needed is a server for read-only files, or for printers alone, it may not make sense to effect a complex installation. For example, a drafting office needs to store old drawings and reference standards. Noone can write files to the server because it is legislatively important that all documents remain unaltered. A share-mode read-only standalone server is an ideal solution.

Another situation that warrants simplicity is an office that has many printers that are queued off a single central server. Everyone needs to be able to print to the printers, there is no need to effect any access controls, and no files will be served from the print server. Again, a share-mode standalone server makes a great solution.

Samba HowTo Guide
Prev Home Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire