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12.3 Avoiding substitution

Keyword substitution has its disadvantages. Sometimes you might want the literal text string `$Author$' to appear inside a file without CVS interpreting it as a keyword and expanding it into something like `$Author: ceder $'.

There is unfortunately no way to selectively turn off keyword substitution. You can use `-ko' (see section Substitution modes) to turn off keyword substitution entirely.

In many cases you can avoid using keywords in the source, even though they appear in the final product. For example, the source for this manual contains `[email protected]{}Author$' whenever the text `$Author$' should appear. In nroff and troff you can embed the null-character \& inside the keyword for a similar effect.


 
 
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