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2.1 Telling CVS where your repository is

There are several ways to tell CVS where to find the repository. You can name the repository on the command line explicitly, with the -d (for "directory") option:

 
cvs -d /usr/local/cvsroot checkout yoyodyne/tc

Or you can set the $CVSROOT environment variable to an absolute path to the root of the repository, `/usr/local/cvsroot' in this example. To set $CVSROOT, csh and tcsh users should have this line in their `.cshrc' or `.tcshrc' files:

 
setenv CVSROOT /usr/local/cvsroot

sh and bash users should instead have these lines in their `.profile' or `.bashrc':

 
CVSROOT=/usr/local/cvsroot
export CVSROOT

A repository specified with -d will override the $CVSROOT environment variable. Once you've checked a working copy out from the repository, it will remember where its repository is (the information is recorded in the `CVS/Root' file in the working copy).

The -d option and the `CVS/Root' file both override the $CVSROOT environment variable. If -d option differs from `CVS/Root', the former is used. Of course, for proper operation they should be two ways of referring to the same repository.


 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire