Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Back: Libtool C++ support
Forward: Dynamic Loading
 
FastBack: Writing Portable C++
Up: Writing Portable C++
FastForward: Dynamic Loading
Top: Autoconf, Automake, and Libtool
Contents: Table of Contents
Index: Index
About: About this document

16.5 Further Reading

A number of books have been published which are devoted to the topic of C++ portability. Unfortunately, the problem with printed publications that discuss the state of C++ is that they date quickly. These publications may also fail to cover inadequacies of your particular compiler, since portability know-how is something that can only be acquired by collective experience.

Instead, online guides such as the Mozilla C++ Portability Guide (37) tend to be a more useful resource. An online guide such as this can accumulate the knowledge of a wider developer community and can be readily updated as new facts are discovered. Interestingly, the Mozilla guide is aggressive in its recommendations for achieving true C++ portability: item 3, for instance, states `Don't use exceptions'. While you may not choose to follow each recommendation, there is certainly a lot of useful experience captured in this document.


This document was generated by Gary V. Vaughan on February, 8 2006 using texi2html

 
 
  Published under the terms of the Open Publication License Design by Interspire