Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

Mouse Skills

This section describes the button conventions and action terminology used in this manual, and also the mouse pointers used throughout the desktop and applications.

Mouse Button Conventions

All the instructions in this manual are for the following types of mouse devices:

  • Devices that are configured for right-hand users.

  • Three button devices.

The mouse button conventions used in this manual are as follows:

Left mouse button

The button on the left side of a mouse device configured for normal right-hand use.

Middle mouse button

The middle button of a mouse device configured for normal right-hand use. On many mice with a scroll wheel, the scroll wheel can be pushed directly down for a middle mouse button click.

Right mouse button

The button on the right side of a mouse device configured for normal right-hand use.

To reverse the handedness of your mouse device, start the Mouse Preferences, then select the options that you require. If you do reverse the handedness of your mouse device, then you must reverse the mouse button conventions used in this manual. See the section called “Mouse Preferences” for more information about setting your mouse preferences.

If you have a two-button mouse device, then your system may be configured to allow you to press the left and right mouse buttons simultaneously to simulate the effect of a middle mouse button press.

Mouse Actions

The following conventions are used in this manual to describe actions that you take with the mouse:

Action

Definition

Click

Press and release the left mouse button, without moving the mouse.

Left-click

Same as click. The term 'left-click' is used where there might be confusion with right-click.

Middle-click

Press and release the middle mouse button, without moving the mouse.

Right-click

Press and release the right mouse button, without moving the mouse.

Double-click

Press and release the left mouse button twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse. You can configure the sensitivity to double-clicks by changing the Double-click Timeout setting: see the section called “Mouse Preferences” for more information.

Drag

Press and do not release the left mouse button, and then move the mouse with the button still held down, and finally release the button.

Dragging with the mouse is used in many different contexts. This moves an object around the screen with the mouse. The object is dropped at the location where the mouse button is released. This action is also called drag-and-drop. Clicking on an element of the interface to move it is sometimes called a grab. Click and drag

For example, you can change the position of a window by dragging on its title bar, or move a file by dragging its icon from one window and dropping it on another.

The left mouse buttons is usually used to perform drag actions, although the middle mouse button is sometimes used for an alternate drag action.

Click-and-hold

Press and do not release the left mouse button.

You can perform the following actions with the mouse:

Left mouse button
  • Select text.

  • Select items.

  • Drag items.

  • Activate items.

Middle mouse button
  • Paste text.

  • Move items.

  • Move windows to the back.

Right mouse button

Use the right mouse button to open a context menu for an item, if a menu applies. For most items, you can also use the Shift+F10 keyboard shortcut to open the context menu once the item has been selected.

For example, when viewing files in the file manager, you select a file by clicking with the left mouse button and open a file by double-clicking with the left mouse button. Clicking with the right mouse button will bring up a context menu for that file.

Tip

In most applications, you can select text with your left mouse button and paste it in another application using the middle mouse button. This is called primary selection paste, and works separately from your normal clipboard operations.

Tip

To select more than one item, you can hold the Ctrl key to select multiple items, or hold the Shift key to select a contiguous range of items. You can also drag a bounding box to select several items by starting the drag in the empty space around items and dragging out a rectangle.

Mouse Pointers

As you use the mouse, the appearance of the mouse pointer can change. The appearance of the pointer provides feedback about a particular operation, location, or state.

The following mouse pointers are shown as your mouse passes over different elements of the screen:

Note

Your mouse pointers will differ from those shown here if you are using a different pointer theme. Your distributor or vendor may have set a different default theme.

Normal pointer.  Normal pointer

This pointer appears during normal use of the mouse.

Busy pointer.  Busy pointer

This pointer appears over a window that is busy performing a task. You cannot use the mouse to give this window any input, but you can move to another window and work with that.

Resize pointer.  Resize pointer

This pointer indicates that you can grab the control to resize parts of the interface. This appears over the borders of windows and over resize handles between panes in a window. The direction of the arrows indicates in which direction you can resize.

Hand pointer  Hand pointer

This pointer appears when you hover over a hypertext link, in a web page for example. This pointer indicates that you can click on the link to load a new document or perform an action.

I-beam pointer  I-beam pointer

This pointer is shown when the mouse is over text that you can select or edit. Click to place the cursor where you want to type text, or drag to select text.

The following mouse pointers are shown when dragging an item such as a file, or a piece of text. They indicate the result of releasing the mouse button to drop the object being moved.

Move pointer.  Move pointer

This pointer indicates that when you drop the object, the object is moved from the old location to the new location.

Copy pointer.  Copy pointer

This pointer indicates that when you drop the object, a copy of the object is created where you drop it.

Symbolic link pointer.  Symbolic link pointer

This pointer indicates that when you drop the object, a symbolic link to the object is created where you drop the object. A symbolic link is a special type of file that points to another file or folder. For more on this, see the section called “Creating a Symbolic Link to a File or Folder”.

Ask pointer.  Ask pointer

This pointer indicates that when you drop the object, you will be given a choice of what to do. A menu will open to allow you to choose which operation you would like to perform. For instance, you may be able to move, copy, or create a symbolic link.

Not available pointer.  Not available pointer

This pointer indicates that you cannot drop the object at the current location. Releasing the mouse button now will have no effect: the dragged object will be returned to its starting location.

Move panel object pointer.  Move panel object pointer

This pointer appears when you drag a panel or a panel object with the middle mouse button. See Chapter 4, Working With Panels for more information on panels.

Move window pointer.  Move window pointer

This pointer appears when you drag a window to move it. See the section called “Manipulating Windows” for more information on moving windows.


Previous
Basic Skills
Desktop User Guide Next
Keyboard Skills

 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire