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Grokking The Gimp
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1.1.4 The Dialogs for Color, Brushes, Patterns, Gradients, and Palettes

Clicking on the Active Foreground Color or Active Background Color patches in the Toolbox window (see Figure  1.1(a)), brings up the Color Selection dialog shown in Figure  1.4(a).

  
Figure 1.4: The Color Selection Dialog
Figure 1.4

The rainbow-colored vertical bar is for choosing hue, and the large colored square is for choosing saturation and value. A color choice is made by clicking and dragging with the mouse to select the desired hue, saturation, and value. Numerical values can also be entered for R (red), G (green), B (blue), H (hue), S (saturation), and V (value) in the data entry boxes. More on these color space components is discussed in Chapter  5. Several other color-choosing dialogs can be used by clicking on the tabs located in the upper part of the window.

Choosing a color in the Color Selection dialog makes that color appear in the Active Foreground Color or Active Background Color patch (see Figure  1.1(a)), depending on which patch was clicked to invoke the Color Selection tool. Clicking the Swap Colors      icon (the two-headed arrow next to the active color patches) switches the foreground and background colors. This can also be accomplished by typing x in the image window. Clicking the Default Colors  icon (the small black and white rectangles below the color patches) reverts the foreground and background colors to their defaults of black and white. This can also be accomplished by typing d in the image window.

Figure  1.5(a)

  
Figure 1.5: The Brush Selection Dialog
Figure 1.5

shows the Brush Selection  dialog. This dialog can be displayed by clicking on the Active Brush icon in the Toolbox window. Clicking on a brush from the dialog makes it appear as the new active brush in the Toolbox window, as shown in Figure  1.5(b).

Figure  1.6(a)

  
Figure 1.6: The Pattern Selection Dialog
Figure 1.6

shows the Pattern Selection dialog . This dialog can be displayed by clicking on the Active Pattern icon in the Toolbox window. Clicking on a pattern from the dialog makes it appear as the new active pattern in the Toolbox window, as shown in Figure  1.6(b).

Figure  1.7(a)

  
Figure 1.7: The Gradients Dialog
Figure 1.7

shows the Gradients dialog.  This dialog can be displayed by clicking on the Active Gradient icon in the Toolbox window. Clicking on a gradient from the dialog makes it appear as the new active gradient in the Toolbox window, as shown in Figure  1.7(b). Furthermore, custom gradients can be created by clicking on the Gradients dialog's Edit button. This produces the Gradient Editor, shown in Figure  1.7(c).

Figure  1.8(a)

  
Figure 1.8: The Color Palette Dialog
Figure 1.8

shows the Color Palette dialog.   This dialog can be displayed from the Image:Dialogs menu or by typing C-p in the Toolbox window. The dialog consists of the Palette tab which displays the active palette. Clicking on the Select tab allows you to choose from a large number of predefined palettes, as shown in Figure  1.8(b). In addition, you can create custom palettes by clicking on the Edit button. This produces the Color Palette Edit  dialog, shown in Figure  1.8(c).




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Grokking The Gimp
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