Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

36.9. Errors and Messages

Use the RAISE statement to report messages and raise errors.

RAISE 
level
 '
format
' [, 
expression
 [, ...]];

Possible levels are DEBUG, LOG, INFO, NOTICE, WARNING, and EXCEPTION. EXCEPTION raises an error (which normally aborts the current transaction); the other levels only generate messages of different priority levels. Whether messages of a particular priority are reported to the client, written to the server log, or both is controlled by the log_min_messages and client_min_messages configuration variables. See Chapter 17 for more information.

Inside the format string, % is replaced by the next optional argument's string representation. Write %% to emit a literal %. Arguments can be simple variables or expressions, and the format must be a simple string literal.

In this example, the value of v_job_id will replace the % in the string:

RAISE NOTICE 'Calling cs_create_job(%)', v_job_id;

This example will abort the transaction with the given error message:

RAISE EXCEPTION 'Nonexistent ID --> %', user_id;

RAISE EXCEPTION presently always generates the same SQLSTATE code, P0001, no matter what message it is invoked with. It is possible to trap this exception with EXCEPTION ... WHEN RAISE_EXCEPTION THEN ... but there is no way to tell one RAISE from another.


 
 
  Published courtesy of The PostgreSQL Global Development Group Design by Interspire