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13.5.5.1. CACHE INDEX Syntax

CACHE INDEX
  tbl_index_list [, tbl_index_list] ...
  IN key_cache_name

tbl_index_list:
  tbl_name [[INDEX|KEY] (index_name[, index_name] ...)]

The CACHE INDEX statement assigns table indexes to a specific key cache. It is used only for MyISAM tables.

The following statement assigns indexes from the tables t1, t2, and t3 to the key cache named hot_cache:

mysql> CACHE INDEX t1, t2, t3 IN hot_cache;
+---------+--------------------+----------+----------+
| Table   | Op                 | Msg_type | Msg_text |
+---------+--------------------+----------+----------+
| test.t1 | assign_to_keycache | status   | OK       |
| test.t2 | assign_to_keycache | status   | OK       |
| test.t3 | assign_to_keycache | status   | OK       |
+---------+--------------------+----------+----------+

The syntax of CACHE INDEX enables you to specify that only particular indexes from a table should be assigned to the cache. The current implementation assigns all the table's indexes to the cache, so there is no reason to specify anything other than the table name.

The key cache referred to in a CACHE INDEX statement can be created by setting its size with a parameter setting statement or in the server parameter settings. For example:

mysql> SET GLOBAL keycache1.key_buffer_size=128*1024;

Key cache parameters can be accessed as members of a structured system variable. See Section 5.2.3.1, “Structured System Variables”.

A key cache must exist before you can assign indexes to it:

mysql> CACHE INDEX t1 IN non_existent_cache;
ERROR 1284 (HY000): Unknown key cache 'non_existent_cache'

By default, table indexes are assigned to the main (default) key cache created at the server startup. When a key cache is destroyed, all indexes assigned to it become assigned to the default key cache again.

Index assignment affects the server globally: If one client assigns an index to a given cache, this cache is used for all queries involving the index, no matter which client issues the queries.


 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire