Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Version Control with Subversion
Prev Home Next


Version Control with Subversion - Basic Work Cycle -

svn revert

Now suppose you see the above diff output, and realize that your changes to README are a mistake; perhaps you accidentally typed that text into the wrong file in your editor.

This is a perfect opportunity to use svn revert .

$ svn revert README
Reverted 'README'

Subversion reverts the file to its pre-modified state by overwriting it with the cached “pristine” copy from the .svn area. But also note that svn revert can undo any scheduled operations—for example, you might decide that you don't want to add a new file after all:

$ svn status foo
?      foo

$ svn add foo
A         foo

$ svn revert foo
Reverted 'foo'

$ svn status foo
?      foo

Note

svn revert ITEM has exactly the same effect as deleting ITEM from your working copy and then running svn update -r BASE ITEM . However, if you're reverting a file, svn revert has one very noticeable difference—it doesn't have to communicate with the repository to restore your file.

Or perhaps you mistakenly removed a file from version control:

$ svn status README 
       README

$ svn delete README 
D         README

$ svn revert README
Reverted 'README'

$ svn status README
       README

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Version Control with Subversion
Prev Home Next

 
 
  Published under the terms of the Creative Commons License Design by Interspire