Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Version Control with Subversion
Prev Home Next


Version Control with Subversion - Contributing to Subversion - Make and Test Your Changes

Make and Test Your Changes

With the code and community policy understanding in hand, you are ready to make your changes. It is best to try to make smaller but related sets of changes, even tackling larger tasks in stages, instead of making huge, sweeping modifications. Your proposed changes will be easier to understand (and therefore easier to review) if you disturb the fewest lines of code possible to accomplish your task properly. After making each set of proposed changes, your Subversion tree should be in a state in which the software compiles with no warnings.

Subversion has a fairly thorough [48] regression test suite, and your proposed changes are expected to not cause any of those tests to fail. By running make check (in Unix) from the top of the source tree, you can sanity-check your changes. The fastest way to get your code contributions rejected (other than failing to supply a good log message) is to submit changes that cause failure in the test suite.

In the best-case scenario, you will have actually added appropriate tests to that test suite which verify that your proposed changes work as expected. In fact, sometimes the best contribution a person can make is solely the addition of new tests. You can write regression tests for functionality that currently works in Subversion as a way to protect against future changes that might trigger failure in those areas. Also, you can write new tests that demonstrate known failures. For this purpose, the Subversion test suite allows you to specify that a given test is expected to fail (called an XFAIL), and so long as Subversion fails in the way that was expected, a test result of XFAIL itself is considered a success. Ultimately, the better the test suite, the less time wasted on diagnosing potentially obscure regression bugs.


[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Version Control with Subversion
Prev Home Next

 
 
  Published under the terms of the Creative Commons License Design by Interspire