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Version Control with Subversion
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Version Control with Subversion - Contributing to Subversion

Contributing to Subversion

The official source of information about the Subversion project is, of course, the project's website at https://subversion.tigris.org/. There you can find information about getting access to the source code and participating on the discussion lists. The Subversion community always welcomes new members. If you are interested in participating in this community by contributing changes to the source code, here are some hints on how to get started.

Join the Community

The first step in community participation is to find a way to stay on top of the latest happenings. To do this most effectively, you will want to subscribe to the main developer discussion list () and commit mail list (). By following these lists even loosely, you will have access to important design discussions, be able to see actual changes to Subversion source code as they occur, and be able to witness peer reviews of those changes and proposed changes. These email based discussion lists are the primary communication media for Subversion development. See the Mailing Lists section of the website for other Subversion-related lists you might be interested in.

But how do you know what needs to be done? It is quite common for a programmer to have the greatest intentions of helping out with the development, yet be unable to find a good starting point. After all, not many folks come to the community having already decided on a particular itch they would like to scratch. But by watching the developer discussion lists, you might see mentions of existing bugs or feature requests fly by that particularly interest you. Also, a great place to look for outstanding, unclaimed tasks is the Issue Tracking database on the Subversion website. There you will find the current list of known bugs and feature requests. If you want to start with something small, look for issues marked as “bite-sized”.


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Version Control with Subversion
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