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openSUSE 11.1 Reference Guide
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22.8 Secure Transactions

Secure transactions can be made with the help of transaction signatures (TSIGs) based on shared secret keys (also called TSIG keys). This section describes how to generate and use such keys.

Secure transactions are needed for communication between different servers and for the dynamic update of zone data. Making the access control dependent on keys is much more secure than merely relying on IP addresses.

Generate a TSIG key with the following command (for details, see man dnssec-keygen):

dnssec-keygen -a hmac-md5 -b 128 -n HOST host1-host2

This creates two files with names similar to these:

Khost1-host2.+157+34265.private Khost1-host2.+157+34265.key

The key itself (a string like ejIkuCyyGJwwuN3xAteKgg==) is found in both files. To use it for transactions, the second file (Khost1-host2.+157+34265.key) must be transferred to the remote host, preferably in a secure way (using scp, for example). On the remote server, the key must be included in the file /etc/named.conf to enable a secure communication between host1 and host2:

key host1-host2. {
 algorithm hmac-md5;
 secret ";ejIkuCyyGJwwuN3xAteKgg==;
};

WARNING: File Permissions of /etc/named.conf

Make sure that the permissions of /etc/named.conf are properly restricted. The default for this file is 0640, with the owner being root and the group named. As an alternative, move the keys to an extra file with specially limited permissions, which is then included from /etc/named.conf. To include an external file, use:

include  "filename"

Replace filename with an absolute path to your file with keys.

To enable the server host1 to use the key for host2 (which has the address 10.1.2.3 in this example), the server's /etc/named.conf must include the following rule:

server 10.1.2.3 {
  keys { host1-host2. ;};
};

Analogous entries must be included in the configuration files of host2.

Add TSIG keys for any ACLs (access control lists, not to be confused with file system ACLs) that are defined for IP addresses and address ranges to enable transaction security. The corresponding entry could look like this:

allow-update { key host1-host2. ;};

This topic is discussed in more detail in the BIND Administrator Reference Manual under update-policy.

openSUSE 11.1 Reference Guide
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