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Solaris Trusted Extensions Administrator's Procedures
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Trusted Extensions Audit Reference

Trusted Extensions software adds audit classes, audit events, audit tokens, and audit policy options to the Solaris OS. Several auditing commands are extended to handle labels. Trusted Extensions audit records include a label, as shown in the following figure.

Figure 24-1 Typical Audit Record on a Labeled System
Illustration shows four tokens in order - header, subject, label, and return - that comprise a typical audit record.

Trusted Extensions Audit Classes

The audit classes that Trusted Extensions software adds to the Solaris OS are listed alphabetically in the following table. The classes are listed in the /etc/security/audit_class file. For more information about audit classes, see the audit_class(4) man page.

Table 24-1 X Server Audit Classes

Short Name

Long Name

Audit Mask

xc

X - Object create/destroy

0x00800000

xp

X - Privileged/administrative operations

0x00400000

xs

X - Operations that always silently fail, if bad

0x02000000

xx

X - All X events in the xl, xc, xp, and xs classes (meta-class)

0x03e00000

The X server audit events are mapped to these classes according to the following criteria:

  • xc – This class audits server objects for creation or for destruction. For example, this class audits CreateWindow().

  • xp – This class audits for use of privilege. Privilege use can be successful or unsuccessful. For example, ChangeWindowAttributes() is audited when a client attempts to change the attributes of another client's window. This class also includes administrative routines such as SetAccessControl().

  • xs – This class audits routines that do not return X error messages to clients on failure when security attributes cause the failure. For example, GetImage() does not return a BadWindow error if it cannot read from a window for lack of privilege.

    These events should be selected for audit on success only. When xs events are selected for failure, the audit trail fills with irrelevant records.

  • xx – This class includes all of the X audit classes.

Trusted Extensions Audit Events

Trusted Extensions software adds audit events to the system. The new audit events and the audit classes to which the events belong are listed in the /etc/security/audit_event file. The audit event numbers for Trusted Extensions are between 9000 and 10000. For more information about audit events, see the audit_event(4) man page.

Trusted Extensions Audit Tokens

The audit tokens that Trusted Extensions software adds to the Solaris OS are listed alphabetically in the following table. The tokens are also listed in the audit.log(4) man page.

Table 24-2 Trusted Extensions Audit Tokens

Token Name

Description

label Token

Sensitivity label

xatom Token

X window atom identification

xclient Token

X client identification

xcolormap Token

X window color information

xcursor Token

X window cursor information

xfont Token

X window font information

xgc Token

X window graphical context information

xpixmap Token

Xwindow pixel mapping information

xproperty Token

X window property information

xselect Token

X window data information

xwindow Token

X window window information

label Token

The label token contains a sensitivity label. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • A sensitivity label

The following figure shows the token format.

Figure 24-2 label Token Format
The context describes the graphic.

A label token is displayed by the praudit command as follows:

sensitivity label,ADMIN_LOW
xatom Token

The xatom token contains information concerning an X atom. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The string length

  • A text string that identifies the atom

An xatom token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X atom,_DT_SAVE_MODE
xclient Token

The xclient token contains information concerning the X client. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The client ID

An xclient token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X client,15
xcolormap Token

The xcolormap token contains information about the colormaps. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

The following figure shows the token format.

Figure 24-3 Format for xcolormap, xcursor, xfont, xgc, xpixmap, and xwindow Tokens
The context describes the graphic.

An xcolormap token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X color map,0x08c00005,srv
xcursor Token

The xcursor token contains information about the cursors. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

Figure 24-3 shows the token format.

An xcursor token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X cursor,0x0f400006,srv
xfont Token

The xfont token contains information about the fonts. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

Figure 24-3 shows the token format.

An xfont token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X font,0x08c00001,srv
xgc Token

The xgc token contains information about the xgc. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

Figure 24-3 shows the token format.

An xgc token is displayed by praudit as follows:

Xgraphic context,0x002f2ca0,srv
xpixmap Token

The xpixmap token contains information about the pixel mappings. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

Figure 24-3 shows the token format.

An xpixmap token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X pixmap,0x08c00005,srv
xproperty Token

The xproperty token contains information about various properties of a window. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

  • A string length

  • A text string that identifies the atom

The following figure shows an xproperty token format.

Figure 24-4 xproperty Token Format
The context describes the graphic.

An xproperty token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X property,0x000075d5,root,_MOTIF_DEFAULT_BINDINGS
xselect Token

The xselect token contains the data that is moved between windows. This data is a byte stream with no assumed internal structure and a property string. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The length of the property string

  • The property string

  • The length of the property type

  • The property type string

  • A length field that gives the number of bytes of data

  • A byte string that contains the data

The following figure shows the token format.

Figure 24-5 xselect Token Format
The context describes the graphic.

An xselect token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X selection,entryfield,halogen
xwindow Token

The xwindow token contains information about a window. This token contains the following fields:

  • A token ID

  • The X server identifier

  • The creator's user ID

Figure 24-3 shows the token format.

An xwindow token is displayed by praudit as follows:

X window,0x07400001,srv

Trusted Extensions Audit Policy Options

Trusted Extensions adds two audit policy options to existing Solaris auditing policy options. List the policies to see the additions:

$ auditconfig -lspolicy
...
windata_down Include downgraded window information in audit records

windata_up   Include upgraded window information in audit records

Extensions to Auditing Commands in Trusted Extensions

The auditconfig, auditreduce, and bsmrecord commands are extended to handle Trusted Extensions information:

  • The auditconfig command includes the Trusted Extensions audit policies. For details, see the auditconfig(1M) man page.

  • The auditreduce command adds the -l option for filtering records according to the label. For details, see the auditreduce(1M) man page.

  • The bsmrecord command includes the Trusted Extensions audit events. For details, see the bsmrecord(1M) man page.

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