Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

System Administration Guide: IP Services
Previous Next

Working With Solaris IP Filter Rule Sets

The following task map identifies the procedures associated with Solaris IP Filter rule sets.

Table 26-3 Working With Solaris IP Filter Rule Sets (Task Map)

Task

Description

For Instructions

Manage, view and modify Solaris IP Filter packet filtering rule sets.

Managing Packet Filtering Rule Sets for Solaris IP Filter

View an active packet filtering rule set.

How to View the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set

View an inactive packet filtering rule set.

How to View the Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set

Activate a different active rule set.

How to Activate a Different or Updated Packet Filtering Rule Set

Remove a rule set.

How to Remove a Packet Filtering Rule Set

Add rules to the rule sets.

How to Append Rules to the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set

How to Append Rules to the Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set

Move between active and inactive rule sets.

How to Switch Between Active and Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Sets

Delete an inactive rule set from the kernel.

How to Remove an Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set From the Kernel

Manage, view and modify Solaris IP Filter NAT rules.

Managing NAT Rules for Solaris IP Filter

View active NAT rules.

How to View Active NAT Rules

Remove NAT rules.

How to Remove NAT Rules

Add additional rules to NAT rules.

How to Append Rules to the NAT Rules

Manage, view and modify Solaris IP Filter address pools.

Managing Address Pools for Solaris IP Filter

View active address pools.

How to View Active Address Pools

Remove an address pool.

How to Remove an Address Pool

Add additional rules to an address pool.

How to Append Rules to an Address Pool

Managing Packet Filtering Rule Sets for Solaris IP Filter

When Solaris IP Filter is enabled, both active and inactive packet filtering rule sets can reside in the kernel. The active rule set determines what filtering is being done on incoming packets and outgoing packets. The inactive rule set also stores rules. These rules are not used unless you make the inactive rule set the active rule set. You can manage, view, and modify both active and inactive packet filtering rule sets.

How to View the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. View the active packet filtering rule set that is loaded in the kernel.
    # ipfstat -io
Example 26-1 Viewing the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows output from the active packet filtering rule set that is loaded in the kernel.

# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
pass in quick on dmfe1 from 192.168.1.0/24 to any
pass in all
block in on dmfe1 from 192.168.1.10/32 to any
How to View the Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. View the inactive packet filtering rule set.
    # ipfstat -I -io
Example 26-2 Viewing the Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows output from the inactive packet filtering rule set.

# ipfstat -I -io
pass out quick on dmfe1 all
pass in quick on dmfe1 all
How to Activate a Different or Updated Packet Filtering Rule Set

Use the following procedure if you want to perform either of the following tasks:

  • Activate a packet filtering rule set other than the one that is currently in use by Solaris IP Filter.

  • Reload the same filtering rule set that has been newly updated.

  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Choose one of the following steps:
    • Create a new rule set in a separate file of your choice if you want to activate an entirely different rule set.

    • Update the current rule set by editing the configuration file that contains that rule set.

  3. Remove the current rule set and load the new rule set.
    # ipf -Fa -f filename

    The filename can either be the new file with the new rule set or the updated file that contains the active rule set.

    The active rule set is removed from the kernel. The rules in the filename file become the active rule set.


    Note - You still need to issue the command even if you are reloading the current configuration file. Otherwise, the old rule set continues to be operative, and the modified rule set in the updated configuration file is not applied.

    Do not use commands such as ipf -D or svcadm restart to load the updated rule set. Such commands expose your network by disabling the firewall first before loading the new rule set.


Example 26-3 Activating a Different Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows how to replace one packet filtering rule set with another packet filtering rule set in a separate configuration file, /etc/ipf/ipf.conf.

# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
pass in quick on dmfe all
# ipf -Fa -f /etc/ipf/ipf.conf
# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
Example 26-4 Reloading an Updated Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows how to reload a packet filtering rule set that is currently active and which is then updated. In this example, the file in use is /etc/ipf/ipf.conf.

# ipfstat -io (Optional)
empty list for ipfilter (out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any

(Edit the /etc/ipf/ipf.conf configuration file.)

# ip -Fa -f /etc/ipf/ipf.conf
# ipfstat -io (Optional)
empty list for ipfilter (out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
block in quick on elx10 from 192.168.0.0/12 to any
How to Remove a Packet Filtering Rule Set
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Remove the rule set.
    # ipf -F [a|i|o]
    -a

    Removes all filtering rules from the rule set.

    -i

    Removes the filtering rules for incoming packets.

    -o

    Removes the filtering rules for outgoing packets.

Example 26-5 Removing a Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows how to remove all filtering rules from the active filtering rule set.

# ipfstat -io
block out log on dmf0 all
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
# ipf -Fa
# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
empty list for ipfilter(in)
How to Append Rules to the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Use one of the following methods to append rules to the active rule set:
    • Append rules to the rule set at the command line using the ipf -f - command.

      # echo "block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any" | ipf -f -
    • Perform the following commands:

      1. Create a rule set in a file of your choice.

      2. Add the rules you have created to the active rule set.

        # ipf -f filename

        The rules in filename are added to the end of the active rule set. Because Solaris IP Filter uses a “last matching rule” algorithm, the added rules determine filtering priorities, unless you use the quick keyword. If the packet matches a rule containing the quick keyword, the action for that rule is taken, and no subsequent rules are checked.

Example 26-6 Appending Rules to the Active Packet Filtering Rule Set

The following example shows how to add a rule to the active packet filtering rule set from the command line.

# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
# echo "block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any" | ipf -f -
# ipfstat -io
empty list for ipfilter(out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any
How to Append Rules to the Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Create a rule set in a file of your choice.
  3. Add the rules you have created to the inactive rule set.
    # ipf -I -f filename

    The rules in filename are added to the end of the inactive rule set. Because Solaris IP Filter uses a “last matching rule” algorithm, the added rules determine filtering priorities, unless you use the quick keyword. If the packet matches a rule containing the quick keyword, the action for that rule is taken, and no subsequent rules are checked.

Example 26-7 Appending Rules to the Inactive Rule Set

The following example shows how to add a rule to the inactive rule set from a file.

# ipfstat -I -io
pass out quick on dmfe1 all
pass in quick on dmfe1 all
# ipf -I -f /etc/ipf/ipf.conf
# ipfstat -I -io
pass out quick on dmfe1 all
pass in quick on dmfe1 all
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
How to Switch Between Active and Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Sets
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Switch the active and inactive rule sets.
    # ipf -s

    This command enables you to switch between the active and inactive rule sets in the kernel. Note that if the inactive rule set is empty, there is no packet filtering.

Example 26-8 Switching Between the Active and Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Sets

The following example shows how using the ipf -s command results in the inactive rule set becoming the active rule set and the active rule set becoming the inactive rule set.

  • Before running the ipf -s command, the output from the ipfstat -I -io command shows the rules in the inactive rule set. The output from the ipfstat -io command shows the rules in the active rule set.

    # ipfstat -io
    empty list for ipfilter(out)
    block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
    block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any
    # ipfstat -I -io
    pass out quick on dmfe1 all
    pass in quick on dmfe1 all
    block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
  • After running the ipf -s command, the output from the ipfstat -I -io and the ipfstat -io command show that the content of the two rules sets have switched.

    # ipf -s
    Set 1 now inactive
    # ipfstat -io
    pass out quick on dmfe1 all
    pass in quick on dmfe1 all
    block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
    # ipfstat -I -io
    empty list for inactive ipfilter(out)
    block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
    block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any
How to Remove an Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set From the Kernel
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Specify the inactive rule set in the “flush all” command.
    # ipf -I -Fa

    This command flushes the inactive rule set from the kernel.


    Note - If you subsequently run ipf -s, the empty inactive rule set will become the active rule set. An empty active rule set means that no filtering will be done.


Example 26-9 Removing an Inactive Packet Filtering Rule Set From the Kernel

The following example shows how to flush the inactive packet filtering rule set so that all rules have been removed.

# ipfstat -I -io
empty list for inactive ipfilter(out)
block in log quick from 10.0.0.0/8 to any
block in on dmfe1 proto tcp from 10.1.1.1/32 to any
# ipf -I -Fa
# ipfstat -I -io
empty list for inactive ipfilter(out)
empty list for inactive ipfilter(in)

Managing NAT Rules for Solaris IP Filter

Use the following procedures to manage, view, and modify NAT rules.

How to View Active NAT Rules
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. View the active NAT rules.
    # ipnat -l
Example 26-10 Viewing Active NAT Rules

The following example shows the output from the active NAT rules set.

# ipnat -l
List of active MAP/Redirect filters:
map dmfe0 192.168.1.0/24 -> 20.20.20.1/32

List of active sessions:
How to Remove NAT Rules
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Remove the current NAT rules.
    # ipnat -C
Example 26-11 Removing NAT Rules

The following example shows how to remove the entries in the current NAT rules.

# ipnat -l
List of active MAP/Redirect filters:
map dmfe0 192.168.1.0/24 -> 20.20.20.1/32

List of active sessions:
# ipnat -C
1 entries flushed from NAT list
# ipnat -l
List of active MAP/Redirect filters:

List of active sessions:
How to Append Rules to the NAT Rules
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Use one of the following methods to append rules to the active rule set:
    • Append rules to the NAT rule set at the command line using the ipnat -f - command.

      # echo "map dmfe0 192.168.1.0/24 -> 20.20.20.1/32" | ipnat -f -
    • Perform the following commands:

      1. Create additional NAT rules in a file of your choice.

      2. Add the rules you have created to the active NAT rules.

        # ipnat -f filename

        The rules in filename are added to the end of the NAT rules.

Example 26-12 Appending Rules to the NAT Rule Set

The following example shows how to add a rule to the NAT rule set from the command line.

# ipnat -l
List of active MAP/Redirect filters:

List of active sessions:
# echo "map dmfe0 192.168.1.0/24 -> 20.20.20.1/32" | ipnat -f -
# ipnat -l
List of active MAP/Redirect filters:
map dmfe0 192.168.1.0/24 -> 20.20.20.1/32

List of active sessions:

Managing Address Pools for Solaris IP Filter

Use the following procedures to manage, view, and modify address pools.

How to View Active Address Pools
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. View the active address pool.
    # ippool -l
Example 26-13 Viewing the Active Address Pool

The following example shows how to view the contents of the active address pool.

# ippool -l
table role = ipf type = tree number = 13
        { 10.1.1.1/32, 10.1.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24; };
How to Remove an Address Pool
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Remove the entries in the current address pool.
    # ippool -F
Example 26-14 Removing an Address Pool

The following example shows how to remove an address pool.

# ippool -l
table role = ipf type = tree number = 13
        { 10.1.1.1/32, 10.1.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24; };
# ippool -F
1 object flushed
# ippool -l
How to Append Rules to an Address Pool
  1. Assume a role that includes the IP Filter Management rights profile, or become superuser.

    You can assign the IP Filter Management rights profile to a role that you create. To create the role and assign the role to a user, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Use one of the following methods to append rules to the active rule set:
    • Append rules to the rule set at the command line using the ippool -f - command.

      # echo "table role = ipf type = tree number = 13 {10.1.1.1/32, 10.1.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24};" | ippool -f -
    • Perform the following commands:

      1. Create additional address pools in a file of your choice.

      2. Add the rules you have created to the active address pool.

        # ippool -f filename

        The rules in filename are added to the end of the active address pool.

Example 26-15 Appending Rules to an Address Pool

The following example shows how to add an address pool to the address pool rule set from the command line.

# ippool -l
table role = ipf type = tree number = 13
        { 10.1.1.1/32, 10.1.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24; };
# echo "table role = ipf type = tree number = 100 {10.0.0.0/32, 172.16.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24};" | ippool -f -
# ippool -l
table role = ipf type = tree number = 100
        { 10.0.0.0/32, 172.16.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24; };
table role = ipf type = tree number = 13
        { 10.1.1.1/32, 10.1.1.2/32, 192.168.1.0/24; };
Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire