Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

System Administration Guide: Advanced Administration
Previous Next

Displaying System Information (Task Map)

Task

Description

For Instructions

Determine whether a system has 32 bit or 64–bit capabilities enabled.

Use the isainfo command to determine whether a system has 32–bit or 64-bit capabilities enabled. For x86 based systems, you can use the isalist command to display this information.

How to Determine Whether a System Has 32-bit or 64-Bit Solaris Capabilities Enabled

Display Solaris Release Information

Display the contents of the /etc/release file to identify your Solaris release version.

How to Display Solaris Release Information

Display General System Information.

Use the showrev command to display general system information.

How to Display General System Information

Display a system's Host ID number.

Use the hostid command to display your system's host id.

How to Display a System's Host ID Number

Display a System's product name

Starting with the Solaris Express 7/05 release, you can use the prtconf -b command to display the product name of a system.

How to Display a System's Product Name

Display a System's Installed Memory

Use the prtconf command to display information about your system's installed memory.

How to Display a System's Installed Memory

Display a system's date and time.

Use the date command to display your system's date and time.

How to Display the Date and Time

Display a system's physical processor type.

Use the psrinfo -p command to list the total number of physical processors on a system.

Use the psrinfo -pv command to list all physical processors on a system and the virtual processors that is associated with each physical processor.

How to Display a System's Physical Processor Type

Display a system's logical processor type.

Use the psrinfo -v command to display a system's logical processor type.

How to Display a System's Logical Processor Type

Display locales that are installed on a system.

Use the localeadm command to display locales that are installed on your system.

How to Display Locales Installed on a System

Determine if a locale is installed on a system.

Use the -q option of the localeadm command and a locale to determine if a locale is installed on your system.

How to Determine if a Locale is Installed on a System

Displaying System Information

The following table describes commands that enable you to display general system information.

Table 5-1 Commands for Displaying System Information

Command

System Information Displayed

Man Page

date

Date and time

date(1)

hostid

Host ID number

hostid(1)

isainfo

The number of bits supported by native applications on the running system, which can be passed as a token to scripts

isainfo(1)

isalist

Processor type for x86 based systems

psrinfo(1M)

localeadm

Locales installed on the system

localeadm(1M)

prtconf

System configuration information, installed memory, and product name

prtconf(1M)

psrinfo

Processor type

psrinfo(1M)

showrev

Host name, host ID, release, kernel architecture, application architecture, hardware provider, domain, and kernel version

showrev(1M)

uname

Operating system name, release, version, node name, hardware name, and processor type

uname(1)

How to Determine Whether a System Has 32–bit or 64–Bit Solaris Capabilities Enabled
  • Use the isainfo command to determine whether a system has 32–bit or 64-bit capabilities enabled.
    # isainfo options

    The isainfo command, run without specifying any options, displays the name or names of the native instruction sets for applications supported by the current OS version.

    -v

    Prints detailed information about the other options

    -b

    Prints the number of bits in the address space of the native instruction set.

    -n

    Prints the name of the native instruction set used by portable applications supported by the current version of the OS.

    -k

    Prints the name of the instruction set or sets that are used by the OS kernel components such as device drivers and STREAMS modules.


    Note - For x86 based systems, the isalist command can also be used to display this information.

    For more information, see theisalist(1) man page.


Example 5-1 SPARC: Determining Whether a System Has 32–Bit or 64–Bit Solaris Capabilities Enabled

The isainfo command output for an UltraSPARC system that is running previous releases of the Solaris OS using a 32-bit kernel is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -v
32-bit sparc applications

This output means that this system can support only 32–bit applications.

The current release of the Solaris OS only ships a 64–bit kernel on SPARC based systems. The isainfo command output for an UltraSPARC system that is running a 64–bit kernel is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -v
64-bit sparcv9 applications 
32-bit sparc applications

This output means that this system is capable of supporting both 32–bit and 64–bit applications.

Use the isainfo -b command to display the number of bits supported by native applications on the running system.

The output from a SPARC based, x86 based, or UltraSPARC system that is running the 32–bit Solaris Operating System is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -b
32

The isainfo command output from a 64–bit UltraSPARC system that is running the 64–bit Solaris Operating System is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -b
64

The command returns 64 only. Even though a 64–bit UltraSPARC system can run both types of applications, 64–bit applications are the best kind of applications to run on a 64–bit system.

Example 5-2 x86: Determining Whether a System Has 32–Bit or 64–Bit Solaris Capabilities Enabled

The isainfo command output for an x86 based system that is running the 64-bit kernel is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo
amd64 i386

This output means that this system can support 64–bit applications.

Use the isainfo -v command to determine if an x86 based system is capable of running a 32–bit kernel.

$ isainfo -v
64-bit amd64 applications
        fpu tsc cx8 cmov mmx ammx a3dnow a3dnowx fxsr sse sse2 
32-bit i386 applications
        fpu tsc cx8 cmov mmx ammx a3dnow a3dnowx fxsr sse sse2 

This output means that this system can support both 64–bit and 32–bit applications.

Use the isainfo -b command to display the number of bits supported by native applications on the running system.

The output from an x86 based system that is running the 32–bit Solaris Operating System is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -b
32

The isainfo command output from an x86 based system that is running the 64–bit Solaris Operating System is displayed as follows:

$ isainfo -b
64

You can also use the isalist command to determine whether an x86 based system is running in 32–bit or 64–bit mode.

$ isalist
amd64 pentium_pro+mmx pentium_pro pentium+mmx pentium i486 i386 i86

In the preceding example, amd64 indicates that the system has 64–bit Solaris capabilities enabled.

How to Display Solaris Release Information
  • Display the contents of the /etc/release file to identify your Solaris release version.
    % cat /etc/release
                               Solaris Nevada snv_26 SPARC
               Copyright 2005 Sun Microsystems, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.
                            Use is subject to license terms.
                                Assembled 24 October 2005
How to Display General System Information
  • To display general system information, use the showrev command.
    $ showrev options
    -a

    Prints all system revision information available.

    -c (command)

    Prints the revision information about command

    -p

    Prints only the revision information about patches.

    -R (root_path)

    Defines the full path name of a directory to use as the root_path.

    -s (host name)

    Performs this operation on the specified host name

    -w

    Prints only the OpenWindows revision information.

    You can also use the uname command to display system information. The following example shows the uname command output. The -a option displays the operating system name as well as the system node name, operating system release, operating system version, hardware name, and processor type.

    $ uname
    SunOS
    $ uname -a
    SunOS starbug 5.10 Generic sun4u sparc SUNW,Ultra-5_10
    $
Example 5-3 Displaying General System Information

The following example shows the showrev command output. The -a option displays all available system information.

% showrev -a
Hostname: suwat
Hostid: 830915da
Release: 5.11
Kernel architecture: sun4u
Application architecture: sparc
Hardware provider: Sun_Microsystems
Domain: boulder.Central.Sun.COM
Kernel version: SunOS 5.11 SunOS_Development

OpenWindows version: 
Solaris X11 Version 6.6.3 12 October 2005

Patch: 116298-08 Obsoletes:  Requires:  Incompatibles: Packages: SUNWxsrt, ...
Patch: 116302-02 Obsoletes:  Requires:  Incompatibles: Packages: SUNWxrpcrt
How to Display a System's Host ID Number
  • To display the host ID number in hexadecimal format, use the hostid command.
Example 5-4 Displaying a System's Host ID Number

The following example shows sample output from the hostid command.

$ hostid
80a5d34c
How to Display a System's Product Name

Solaris 10 1/06: The -b option to the prtconf command enables you to display a system's product name. For more information on this feature, see the prtconf(1M) man page.

  • To display the product name for your system, use the prtconf command with the -b option.
Example 5-5 Displaying a System's Product Name

This example shows sample output from the prtconf -b command.

# prtconf -b
name:  SUNW,Ultra-5_10
model:  SUNW,375-0066
banner-name:  Sun Ultra 5/10 UPA/PCI (UltraSPARC-IIi 333MHz)

This example shows sample output from the prtconf -vb command.

# prtconf -vb
name:  SUNW,Ultra-5_10
model:  SUNW,375-0066
banner-name:  Sun Ultra 5/10 UPA/PCI (UltraSPARC-IIi 333MHz)
idprom: 01800800.20a6c363.00000000.a6c363a9.00000000.00000000.405555aa.aa555500
openprom model:  SUNW,3.15
openprom version: 'OBP 3.15.2 1998/11/10 10:35'
How to Display a System's Installed Memory
  • To display the amount of memory that is installed on your system, use the prtconf command.
Example 5-6 Displaying a System's Installed Memory

The following example shows sample output from the prtconf command. The grep Memory command selects output from the prtconf command to display memory information only.

# prtconf | grep Memory
Memory size: 128 Megabytes
How to Display the Date and Time
  • To display the current date and time according to your system clock, use the date command.
Example 5-7 Displaying the Date and Time

The following example shows sample output from the date command.

$ date
Wed Jan 21 17:32:59 MST 2004
$

psrinfo Command Option to Identify Chip Multithreading Features

Solaris 10: The psrinfo command has been modified to provide information about physical processors, in addition to information about virtual processors. This enhanced functionality has been added to identify chip multithreading (CMT) features. The new -p option reports the total number of physical processors that are in a system. Using the psrinfo -pv command will list all the physical processors that are in the system, as well as the virtual processors that are associated with each physical processor. The default output of the psrinfo command continues to display the virtual processor information for a system.

For more information, see the psrinfo(1M) man page.

For information about the procedures associated with this feature, see How to Display a System's Physical Processor Type.

How to Display a System's Physical Processor Type

  • Use the psrinfo -p command to display the total number of physical processors on a system.
    $ psrinfo -p
    1

    Use the psrinfo -pv command to display information about each physical processor on a system, and the virtual processor associated with each physical processor.

    $ psrinfo -pv
    The UltraSPARC-IV physical processor has 2 virtual processors (8, 520)
    The UltraSPARC-IV physical processor has 2 virtual processors (9, 521)
    The UltraSPARC-IV physical processor has 2 virtual processors (10, 522)
    The UltraSPARC-IV physical processor has 2 virtual processors (11, 523)
    The UltraSPARC-III+ physical processor has 1 virtual processor (16)
    The UltraSPARC-III+ physical processor has 1 virtual processor (17)
    The UltraSPARC-III+ physical processor has 1 virtual processor (18)
    The UltraSPARC-III+ physical processor has 1 virtual processor (19)

    When you use the psrinfo -pv command on an x86 based system, the following output is displayed:

    $ psrinfo -pv
    The i386 physical processor has 2 virtual processors (0, 2)
    The i386 physical processor has 2 virtual processors (1, 3)

How to Display a System's Logical Processor Type

  • Use the psrinfo -v command to display information about a system's processor type.
    $ psrinfo -v

    On an x86 based system, use the isalist command to display the virtual processor type.

    $ isalist
Example 5-8 SPARC: Displaying a System's Processor Type

This example shows how to display information about a SPARC based system's processor type.

$ psrinfo -v
Status of virtual processor 0 as of: 04/16/2004 10:32:13
  on-line since 03/22/2004 19:18:27.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 650 MHz,
  and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Example 5-9 x86: Displaying a System's Processor Type

This example shows how to display information about an x86 based system's processor type.

$ isalist
pentium_pro+mmx pentium_pro pentium+mmx pentium i486 i386 i86

New localeadm Command

Solaris 10: The new localeadm command allows you to change the locales on your system without reinstalling the OS or manually adding and removing packages. This command also allows you to query your system to determine which locales are installed. To run the localeadm command, you must have superuser privileges or assume an equivalent role through role-based access control (RBAC).

For more information, see the localeadm(1M) man page.

For more information in this guide, see Chapter 5, Displaying and Changing System Information (Tasks).

How to Display Locales Installed on a System

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Display the locales currently installed on your system using the localeadm command. The -l option displays the locales that are installed on the system. For example:
    # localeadm -l
    Checking for installed pkgs. This could take a while.
    
    Checking for Australasia region (aua)
    (1of2 pkgs)
    |......|
    .
    .
    .
    The following regions are installed on concordance on Wed Dec 17 15:13:00 MST 2003
    
    
    POSIX (C)
    
    Central Europe (ceu)
    [ Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, 
    Switzerland (German), Switzerland (French) ]
    
    Done.

How to Determine if a Locale is Installed on a System

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Determine if a locale is installed on your system using the localeadm command. The -q option and a locale queries the system to see if that locale is installed on the system. To see if the Central European region (ceu) is installed on your system, for example:
    # localeadm -q ceu
    locale/region name is ceu
    Checking for Central Europe region (ceu)
    .
    .
    .
    The Central Europe region (ceu) is installed on this system
Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire