Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

System Administration Guide: Basic Administration
Previous Next

Configuring the Java Web Console

The Java Web Console is preconfigured to run without administrator intervention. However, you might choose to change some of the web console's default behavior by overriding the console's configuration properties.


Note - Starting with the Solaris 10 11/06 OS, you must use the wcadmin command to change these properties. Previously, the smreg command was used. For more information about the wcadmin command, see the wcadmin(1M) man page.


Properties in the console's configuration files control the behavior of the console. To change the behavior, you define new values for properties to override the default values. The default values of most properties should not be overridden unless there is a specific need that the default values do not provide, such as specifying your own login service.

In general, the property values that you might consider changing are the following:

  • Console session timeout

    The web console's session timeout period is controlled by the session.timeout.value property. This property controls how long a web console page can be displayed without user interaction before the session times out. After the timeout is reached, the user must log in again. The default value is 15 minutes. You can set a new value, in minutes, to conform to your own security policy. However, keep in mind that this property controls the timeout period for all console users and all registered applications.

    See Example 3-1 for an example of how to change the session timeout.

  • Logging level

    You use logging properties to configure the logging service. The console log files are created in the /var/log/webconsole/console directory. The logging.default.level property determines which messages are logged. The console logs provide valuable information for troubleshooting problems.

    The logging level applies to any messages that are written through the logging service, which by default uses syslog in the Solaris release The syslog log file is /var/adm/messages. The file /var/log/webconsole/console/console_debug_log contains log messages written when the debugging service is enabled. This is done by setting the debug.trace.level property as described in Using the Console Debug Trace Log. Although the default logging and debug logging services are separate, all Java Web Console logging messages to syslog are also written to the console_debug_log to aid in debugging. Generally, the logging service, set with logging.default.level, should be always enabled for logging by console applications. Debug logging, set with debug.trace.level, should only be enabled to investigate problems.

    The following property values are available for logging.default.level:

    • all

    • info

    • off

    • severe

    • warning

    See Example 3-2 for an example that shows how to change the logging level.

  • Auditing implementation

    Auditing is the process of generating and logging security-related management events. An event signifies that a specific user has updated the management information on a system. The auditing implementation is used by services and applications that generate audit events.

    The following audit events are defined by the web console:

    • Login

    • Logout

    • Role assumption

    When audit events occur, a record of the event is made in an audit log. The location of the audit log varies with the auditing implementation that is in use. The web console's auditing service uses an auditing implementation that is provided by the underlying operating system.

    The web console supports three auditing implementations: Solaris, Log, and None. You can select an auditing implementation by specifying one of these keywords for the value of the audit.default.type configuration property. Only one auditing implementation is in effect at a time.

    The supported auditing implementation types are:

    • Solaris

      The Solaris implementation is the default. This implementation supports the BSM auditing mechanism. The auditing mechanism writes audit records into a system file in the /var/audit directory.

      You can display the records with the praudit command. For events to be captured, you must enable the BSM auditing mechanism on the system. In addition, the /etc/security/audit_control file must contain entries that indicate which events should be generated. You must set the lo event as the flag option to see login and logout events for each user. For more information, see the praudit(1M) and bsmconv(1M) man pages and Part VII, Solaris Auditing, in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

    • Log

      You can configure this implementation to write to the system's syslog service. Audit messages are written to the console log if the logging service has been enabled at the info level. See Example 3-2 for more information.

    • None

      No audit events are generated. Audit messages are written to the debug trace log, if enabled.

See Example 3-5 for an example of specifying the auditing implementation.

How to Change Java Web Console Properties

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Depending on which Solaris release you are running, change the selected property value as follows:
    • If you are running at least the Solaris 10 11/06 release, use this command:
      # wcadmin add -p -a console name=value
      -p

      Specifies that the object type is a property.

      -a console

      Specifies that the property changes are for the application named console. The -a console option must always be used when you are changing console properties.

      name=value

      Specifies the property name and the new value for that property.

    • If you are not running at least the Solaris Express 5/06 release, use this command:
      # smreg add -p -c name
  3. (Optional) Reset a console property to its default value.
    • If you are running at least the Solaris 10 11/06 release, use this command:
      # wcadmin remove -p -a console name=value
    • If you are not running at least the Solaris Express 5/06 release, use this command:
      # smreg remove -p -c name
      -p

      Specifies that the object type is a property.

      -c

      Specifies that the property changes are for the console application. The -c option must always be used when you are changing console properties.

      name

      Specifies the property name and the new value for that property.

Example 3-1 Changing the Java Web Console's Session Timeout Property

This example shows how to set the session time out value to 5 minutes.

# wcadmin add -p -a console session.timeout.value=5
Example 3-2 Configuring the Java Web Console Logging Level

This example shows you how to set the logging level to all.

# wcadmin add -p -a console logging.default.level=all
Example 3-3 Resetting the Java Web Console Logging Level to the Default Value

This example shows how to reset the logging level to the default.

# wcadmin remove -p -a console logging.default.level
Example 3-4 Specifying a Java Version for the Java Web Console

This example shows how to set the Java version for the console.

# wcadmin add -p -a console java.home=/usr/java
Example 3-5 Choosing an Auditing Implementation for the Java Web Console

This example shows you how to set the auditing implementation to None.

# wcadmin add -p -a console audit.default.type=None

The valid auditing types are:

None

No auditing

Log

Audit messages to syslog

Solaris

Audit messages to BSM

Java Web Console User Identity

By default, the web console runs under the user identity, noaccess. However, some system configurations disable the noaccess user, or set the login shell for the noaccess user to an invalid entry to make this user identity unusable.

When the noaccess user is not usable, the web console server cannot be started or configured, so an alternative user identity must be specified. Ideally, the user identity should be changed only once, before the console server is configured at initial startup.

You can configure the web console to run under an alternative non-root user identity by using either of the following commands before the console starts:

# smcwebserver start -u username

This command starts the web console server under the specified user identity. The web console server runs under this identity each time the server is subsequently started if the command is issued before the first console start.

If you are running at least the Solaris 10 11/06 release, you can also use this command:

# wcadmin add -p -a console com.sun.web.console.user=username

Note - Starting with the Solaris 10 11/06 release, when the system initially starts, the console also starts and is automatically configured to run under noaccess. Consequently, the user identity is set to noaccess before you are able to change the user identity. Use the following commands to reset the console to its initial unconfigured state. Then, specify a different user identity when you restart the console.

# smcwebserver stop
# /usr/share/webconsole/private/bin/wcremove -i console
# smcwebserver start -u new_user_identity

If you are not running at least the Solaris Express 5/06 release, use this command:

For the Solaris 10, Solaris 10 1/06, Solaris 10 6/06 releases, use this command:

# smreg add -p -c com.sun.web.console.user=username

This command causes the web console server to run under the specified user identity the next time the server starts, and each time the server is started.

Using the Console Debug Trace Log

By default, the console does not log debug messages. You can turn on debug logging to help troubleshoot console service problems.

Use the debug.trace.level property to turn on debug logging by setting the property to a value other than 0.

Available choices include the following:

  • 1 - Use this setting to record potentially severe errors.

  • 2 - Use this setting to record important messages, as well as error messages of the 1 level.

  • 3 - Use this setting to record all possible messages with full details.

By default, the debug trace log is created in the /var/log/webconsole directory . Starting with the Solaris 10 11/06 release, the log is created in the /var/log/webconsole/console directory. The log file is named console_debug_log. Historical logs, such as console_debug_log.1 and console_debug_log.2 might also exist in this directory. There can be up to five (default setting) historical logs stored in this directory before the earliest log is deleted and a new log is created.

Example 3-6 Setting the Console Debug Trace Log Level

Use the following command to set the debug trace log level to 3.

For the Solaris 10 11/06 release, use this command:

# wcadmin add -p -a console debug.trace.level=3

For the Solaris 10, Solaris 10 1/06, and the Solaris 10 6/06 releases, use this command:

# smreg add -p -c debug.trace.level=3
Example 3-7 Checking the Status of the debug.trace.level Property

To check the status of the debug.trace.level property, use the wcadmin list or smreg list command.

Solaris 10 11/06:

# wcadmin list -p | grep "debug.trace.level"

If you are not running at least the Solaris Express 5/06 release, use this command:

# smreg list -p | grep "debug.trace.level"
Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire