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System Administration Guide: Virtualization Using the Solaris Operating System
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Introduction to Resource Pools

Resource pools enable you to separate workloads so that workload consumption of certain resources does not overlap. This resource reservation helps to achieve predictable performance on systems with mixed workloads.

Resource pools provide a persistent configuration mechanism for processor set (pset) configuration and, optionally, scheduling class assignment.

Figure 12-1 Resource Pool Framework
Illustration shows that a pool is made up of one processor set and optionally, a scheduling class.

A pool can be thought of as a specific binding of the various resource sets that are available on your system. You can create pools that represent different kinds of possible resource combinations:

pool1: pset_default

pool2: pset1

pool3: pset1, pool.scheduler="FSS"

By grouping multiple partitions, pools provide a handle to associate with labeled workloads. Each project entry in the /etc/project file can have a single pool associated with that entry, which is specified using the project.pool attribute.

When pools are enabled, a default pool and a default processor set form the base configuration. Additional user-defined pools and processor sets can be created and added to the configuration. A CPU can only belong to one processor set. User-defined pools and processor sets can be destroyed. The default pool and the default processor set cannot be destroyed.

The default pool has the pool.default property set to true. The default processor set has the pset.default property set to true. Thus, both the default pool and the default processor set can be identified even if their names have been changed.

The user-defined pools mechanism is primarily for use on large machines of more than four CPUs. However, small machines can still benefit from this functionality. On small machines, you can create pools that share noncritical resource partitions. The pools are separated only on the basis of critical resources.

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  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire