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Solaris CIFS Administration Guide
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Managing CIFS Shares (Task Map)

You can add, view, and update CIFS shares. A directory must exist before it can be shared. For more information about CIFS shares, see CIFS Shares.

The following table points to the tasks that you can use to manage CIFS shares.

Task

Description

For Instructions

Configure cross-protocol locking.

Use the mount or the zfs create command to configure cross-protocol locking. These commands enable this locking by setting the nbmand option.

How to Configure Cross-Protocol Locking

Create a CIFS share by using the ZFS sharesmb property.

Use this procedure if you want to make a file or directory available to clients. You might use this procedure if you are familiar with the ZFS sharenfs property.

How to Create a CIFS Share (zfs)

Create a CIFS share by using the sharemgr command.

Use this procedure if you want to make a file or directory available to clients. If you specify an AD container, sharemgr will attempt to publish those shares in AD.

How to Create a CIFS Share (sharemgr)

Modify the properties of a CIFS share by using the sharemgr command.

Use this procedure to change share property values.

How to Modify CIFS Share Properties (sharemgr)

Remove a CIFS share by using the sharemgr command.

When you remove a share, it can no longer be accessed by a system. If you are connected to the share when it is removed, the share is not removed until there are no more connections to that share. At that time, the share is removed.

How to Remove a CIFS Share (sharemgr)

Create an autohome share rule.

Specify custom share rules for autohome shares.

How to Create a Specific Autohome Share Rule

How to Configure Cross-Protocol Locking

The CIFS protocol assumes mandatory locking, but UNIX traditionally uses advisory locking. The Solaris OS can be configured to use mandatory locking on a per mount basis by using the non-blocking mandatory locking (nbmand) mount option.

When set, the nbmand mount option enforces mandatory cross-protocol share reservations and byte-range locking.

When the nbmand mount option is not set, the Solaris CIFS service will enforce mandatory share reservations and byte-range locking internally for all CIFS clients. However, without nbmand set, there is only limited coordination with NFS and local processes.

  1. Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Set the nbmand mount option for an existing file system by doing one of the following:
    • Set the option by using the mount command.
      # mount -o nbmand=on fsname

      For example, the following command sets the nbmand mount option for the ztank/myfs file system:

      # mount -o nbmand ztank/myfs
    • Set the option by using the zfs create command.

      When using ZFS, you can also set the nbmand option when the file system is created, so that the file system uses nbmand automatically:

      # zfs create -o nbmand=on fsname

      The following example combines the nbmand option with the mixed-case sensitivity option:

      # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on -o mountpoint=mntpt ztank/myfs

How to Create a CIFS Share (zfs)

This procedure describes how to use the ZFS sharesmb property to create shares on the Solaris CIFS service.

To create an autohome share, you must have defined autohome rules. For more information, see How to Create a Specific Autohome Share Rule.

  1. Become superuser, assume an equivalent role, obtain the solaris.smf.value.smb and solaris.smf.manage.smb RBAC authorizations, or use the “SMB Management” RBAC profile, which is part of the “File System Management” profile.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Create a ZFS pool and a mixed-case ZFS file system that supports cross-protocol locking.
    # zpool create pool-name vdev
    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on fsname
  3. Enable SMB sharing for the ZFS file system.
    # zfs set sharesmb=on fsname

    Note - The resource name for the share is automatically constructed by the zfs command when the share is created. The resource name is based on the dataset name, unless you specify a resource name. Any characters that are illegal for resource names are replaced by an underscore character (_).


    To specify a resource name for the share, specify a name for the sharesmb property, sharesmb=name=resource-name.

  4. Verify how the file system is shared.
    # sharemgr show -vp
Example 3-3 Using sharesmb to Manage CIFS Shares

The following examples use the sharesmb property to enable SMB sharing for ZFS pools and file systems.

  • Inherited SMB sharing for ZFS file systems in a pool. The following commands create a pool and enable SMB sharing for that pool. When you create the ZFS file systems in that pool, the file systems inherit the SMB sharing as well as the resource name.

    # zpool create sandbox c0t3d0
    # zfs set sharesmb=on sandbox
    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on sandbox/fs1
    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on sandbox/fs2

    The sharemgr show -vp command shows how the top level file system has a resource name of sandbox, but the children have the dataset name added to the resource name.

    # sharemgr show -vp
    default nfs=()
    mygroup smb=()
    zfs nfs=() smb=()
         zfs/sandbox smb=()
               sandbox=/sandbox
               sandbox_fs1=/sandbox/fs1       smb=()
               sandbox_fs2=/sandbox/fs2       smb=()
  • SMB sharing for a ZFS file system. The following commands create a ZFS pool and a mixed-case file system that supports cross-protocol locking:

    # zpool create sandbox c0t3d0
    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on sandbox/fs1

    Next, you can enable SMB sharing for the sandbox/fs1 file system and for any of its children by setting the sharesmb property to on.

    # zfs set sharesmb=on sandbox/fs1

    Because CIFS shares must have a resource name, ZFS constructs a resource name from the dataset name. Any characters in the dataset name that are illegal in resource names are replaced by the underscore character (_). In this example, the resource name sandbox_fs1 is based on the dataset name sandbox/fs1.

    You can use the sharemgr show -vp command to verify how the file system is shared.

    # sharemgr show -vp
    default nfs=()
    mygroup smb=()
    zfs nfs=() smb=()
         zfs/sandbox/fs1 smb=()
               sandbox_fs1=/sandbox/fs1

    The following commands create another file system in the sandbox pool called fs2 and associate that file system with the myshare resource name:

    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on sandbox/fs2
    # zfs set sharesmb=name=myshare sandbox/fs2

    Use the sharemgr show -vp command to verify how the file systems are shared.

    # sharemgr show -vp
    default nfs=()
    mygroup smb=()
    zfs nfs=() smb=()
         zfs/sandbox/fs1 smb=()
               sandbox_fs1=/sandbox/fs1
         zfs/sandbox/fs2 smb=()
               myshare=/sandbox/fs2

    The following command creates a sub file system of sandbox/fs2 called sandbox/fs2/fs2_sub1:

    # zfs create -o casesensitivity=mixed -o nbmand=on sandbox/fs2/fs2_sub1

    This new file system inherits part of its resource name from its parent and also inherits sharing over SMB, if enabled. Because the resource name for sandbox/fs2 is myshare, the resource name for sandbox/fs2/fs2_sub1 is myshare_fs2_sub1.

    # sharemgr show -vp
    default nfs=()
    mygroup smb=()
    zfs nfs=() smb=()
         zfs/sandbox/fs1 smb=()
               sandbox_fs1=/sandbox/fs1
         zfs/sandbox/fs2 smb=()
               myshare=/sandbox/fs2
               myshare_fs2_sub1=/sandbox/fs2/fs2_sub1

    If you disable SMB sharing for sandbox/fs2, that file system and its children are affected.

    # zfs set sharesmb=off sandbox/fs2
    # sharemgr show -vp
    default nfs=()
    mygroup smb=()
    zfs nfs=() smb=()
         zfs/sandbox/fs1 smb=()
               sandbox_fs1=/sandbox/fs1

    The sharemgr show -vp output shows that the sandbox/fs2 file system and its children are no longer shared over SMB.

How to Create a CIFS Share (sharemgr)

This procedure describes how to create a share definition on the Solaris CIFS service and make the share available to clients.

To create an autohome share, you must have defined autohome rules. For more information, see How to Create a Specific Autohome Share Rule.

  1. Become superuser, assume an equivalent role, obtain the solaris.smf.value.smb and solaris.smf.manage.smb RBAC authorizations, or use the “SMB Management” RBAC profile, which is part of the “File System Management” profile.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Define a share in the default share group or in another share group.

    A share name can include any alphanumeric characters, but not the characters listed here:

    " / \ [ ] : | + ; , ? * =

    Create a share group and add a share to that group.

    # sharemgr create -P smb group-name
    # sharemgr add-share -r resource-name -s share-path group-name
  3. If AD is enabled, specify the AD container where the share will be published.

    Note - The container must already exist for the share to be published in that container. The system does not create container objects in the AD tree.


    # sharemgr set [-hnv] -P smb [-S option-set] [-p property=value … \ [-s share-path] group-name

How to Modify CIFS Share Properties (sharemgr)

Use this procedure to change properties on a share.

  1. Become superuser, assume an equivalent role, obtain the solaris.smf.value.smb and solaris.smf.manage.smb RBAC authorizations, or use the “SMB Management” RBAC profile, which is part of the “File System Management” profile.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Modify the CIFS share properties.
    • Modify properties for a single share.
      # sharemgr set-share [-r resource-name] [-d "description"] -s share-path group-name

      For example, the following command changes the description for the /files/acme.sales.logs share in the nw-sales group:

      # sharemgr set-share -d "Sales logs for Acme" -s /files/acme.sales.logs nw-sales
    • Modify properties for a share group.
      # sharemgr set [-hnv] -P smb [-S option-set] [-p property=value] … \ [-s share-path] group-name

      For example, in domain mode you can configure shares to be published in an AD container. The following command specifies that shares in the nw-sales share group will be published in the default container. Note that filesvr is the machine account of the system that is running the Solaris CIFS service.

      # sharemgr set -P smb -p ad-container=cn=filesvr,cn=Computers nw-sales

      If you want to publish shares to a non-default container, you must modify the ACLs of that container to give the Solaris CIFS service permission to publish and unpublish shares.

How to Remove a CIFS Share (sharemgr)

This procedure describes how to remove a CIFS share. When you remove a CIFS share, the definition of the share is removed from the server. You can re-create such a share with the sharemgr add-share command.

  1. Become superuser, assume an equivalent role, obtain the solaris.smf.value.smb and solaris.smf.manage.smb RBAC authorizations, or use the “SMB Management” RBAC profile, which is part of the “File System Management” profile.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Remove a CIFS share.
    # sharemgr remove-share -s share-path group-name

    For example, to remove share /sales/share1 from share group mysharegroup, type:

    # sharemgr remove-share -s /sales/share1 mysharegroup

How to Create a Specific Autohome Share Rule

The autohome share feature eliminates the administrative task of defining and maintaining home directory shares for each user that accesses the system through the SMB protocol. The system creates autohome shares when a user logs in, and removes them when the user logs out. This procedure describes how to configure autohome shares by adding rules to a configuration file.

For information about the smbautohome format, see Autohome Entries and the smbautohome(4) man page.

  1. Become superuser, assume an equivalent role, obtain the solaris.smf.value.smb and solaris.smf.manage.smb RBAC authorizations, or use the “SMB Management” RBAC profile, which is part of the “File System Management” profile.

    Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services. To configure a role with the Primary Administrator profile, see Chapter 2, Working With the Solaris Management Console (Tasks), in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Edit the /etc/smbautohome file.

    An autohome entry must be on a single line in the following format:

    key    location    [container]
    1. Specify the user name in the key field.

      Usually this field is a user name, but it can also be one of the following:

      • +nsswitch Uses the naming service to match users to home directories if no rule matches.

      • Asterisk (*) – Matches a user name to a home directory that uses the same name.

    2. Specify the location of the user's home directory in the location field.

      Specify the absolute path excluding the user name, or use one of the following substitution characters:

      • Question mark (?) – Substitutes for the first character of the user name.

      • Ampersand (&) – Substitutes for a complete user name.

      For example, the following rule maps to /home/a/amy:

      amy             /home/?/&

      For more information about the path, see Autohome Shares.

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