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Solaris Express Developer Edition Release Notes
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Solaris Express Developer Edition 2/07 Issues

The following issues apply to the Developer 2/07 release.

The Linux Partition Does Not Display on the GRUB Menu After Installing the Solaris OS (6508647)

If Linux is installed on your disk and you installed the Solaris OS on a separate partition, the Linux partition does not display on the GRUB menu. No error message is displayed.

Workaround: Edit the GRUB menu's menu.lst file to add Linux to the GRUB menu. Perform the following steps:

  1. Boot the Solaris OS.

  2. Edit the menu.lst file at /boot/grub/menu.lst. For more information, see the System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

The Linux Partition is Not Recognized When Installing the Solaris OS (6507774)

When you are installing the Solaris OS, the installer enables installing on the whole disk, but not on the Solaris partition that you've created. This problem occurs under the following conditions:

  • You are installing with the Solaris interactive installation graphical user interface (GUI)

  • You have Linux and a Linux swap partition installed on your system

  • You have created a dual-boot partition for Solaris before running the installer

The following error message is displayed:

WARNING: The initial fdisk information found on disk<disk> was invalid. 
Defaulting the entire disk to a Solaris partition.

Workaround: Modify the partition ID for the Linux swap partition. Perform the following steps:

  1. Exit the installer.

  2. Open a terminal window.

  3. Copy the current fdisk partition table to a temporary file.

    # fdisk -W /tmp/partfile /dev/rdsk/<disk>p0
  4. Open the /tmp/partfile in vi editor.

  5. Change the ID of the Linux swap partition from 130 to 132.

  6. Write the fdisk partition table from the edited file.

    # fdisk -F /tmp/partfile /dev/rdsk/<disk>p0
  7. Restart the installer.

    # install-solaris
  8. Reboot the system after the Solaris installation is complete.

  9. Change the partition ID of the Linux swap partition back to 130 by performing step 4 through step 7.

sd Treats an fdisk Partitioned Disk as EFI Partitioned Disk (6355349)

If a GPT backup header is left on a disk after the disk is repartitioned to a format other than EFI or GPT, the Solaris OS might treat the disk as EFI or GPT labeled. This error occurs only if an EFI or GPT labeled disk is repartitioned with earlier releases of Solaris or by using a utility that is not EFI or GPT aware. If the GPT backup is used, the following warning is displayed:

primary label corrupt; using backup

Workaround 1: Clear the entire disk before you repartition the disk.

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdsk/c1t3d0

Workaround 2: Clear the GPT backup header that resides in the last block of the disk. Perform the following steps:

  1. Run the format command on the disk and specify the verify option. Note the values of the sectors.

    #echo  "verify" | format /dev/rdsk/c1t3d0 | grep "^sectors"
            Reading the primary EFI GPT label failed.  Using backup label.
            Use the 'backup' command to restore the primary label.
            sectors = 143374743
  2. (Optional) Copy the contents of the specified block.

    dd if=/dev/rdsk/c1t3d0 of=/var/tmp/lastblock iseek=143374743
  3. Clear the specified block.

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdsk/c1t3d0 oseek=143374743

The Solaris Partition is Not Recognized When Installing the Solaris OS (6346759)

When you are installing the Solaris OS, the installer does not install the OS on the Solaris partition that you have created. Instead, the installer tries to install the OS on the Linux swap partition. This problem occurs under the following conditions:

  • You are installing with the Solaris interactive installation in text mode.

  • You have Linux and a Linux swap partition installed on your system.

  • You have created a separate partition for Solaris before running the installer.

No error message is displayed.

Workaround: Modify the partition ID for the Linux swap partition. Perform the following steps:

  1. Exit the installer.

  2. Open a terminal window.

  3. Copy the current fdisk partition table to a temporary file.

    # fdisk -W /tmp/partfile /dev/rdsk/<disk>p0
  4. Open the /tmp/partfile in vi editor.

  5. Change the ID of the Linux swap partition from 130 to 132.

  6. Write the fdisk partition table from the edited file.

    # fdisk -F /tmp/partfile /dev/rdsk/<disk>p0
  7. Restart the installer.

    # install-solaris
  8. Reboot the system after the Solaris installation is complete.

  9. Change the partition ID of the Linux swap partition back to 130 by performing step 4 through step 7.

Installation Defaults to Developer Release

The Developer 2/07 release includes a set of developer tools and uses a quick installation process.

Workaround: The prior default was to install the Solaris Express release. The Solaris Express release does not include the developer tools set. However, the Solaris Express release enables you to customize your system configuration during the installation. If you want to install the Solaris Express release, you must select that release in the initial installation screen.

Extended Partitions Maintained

If you have another OS on an extended partition, the existing extended partition is not changed and is not lost during a Solaris Developer release installation. Existing extended partitions are not visible during the Developer release installation, but the primary fdisk partition in which the extended partition resides is visible. Data in these partitions is not lost due to the installation. The OS on the extended partition does not display on the GRUB menu. For instructions about how to add another OS to the GRUB menu, see Introduction to GRUB Based Booting in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

Workaround: None.

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