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Solaris Express Developer Edition Release Notes
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Solaris Express 12/05 Issues

The following issues apply to the Solaris Express 12/05 release.

x86: Cannot Configure Full-Screen Magnification on Systems With One Video Card

If your Solaris 10 system has a single physical video card, you cannot configure the system for full-screen magnification. For such a configuration, you must use a separate configuration file in which you define settings for a dummy driver. First, make sure that the Xserver is not running. Then perform the following steps:

  1. Log in to a command-line session.

    • If you are using the GNOME Display Manager, follow these steps:

      1. Log in to a session as superuser.

      2. At the prompt, type svcadm disable application/gdm2-login.

      3. Log in again as superuser.

    • If you are using dtlogin, follow these steps:

      1. In the dtlogin window, click Options and select Command Line Login.

      2. Log in as superuser.

  2. Create a new xorg.conf file.

    # /usr/X11/bin/Xorg -configure

    The command creates the file xorg.conf.new in the root (/) directory.

  3. Copy the new configuration file to the /etc/x11 directory and rename the file xorg.conf.

    # cp /xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf
  4. Modify the configurations in the file by using the following sample configurations:

    • Add a new monitor section.

      Section "Monitor"
         Identifier   "monitor_dummy"
         ModelName    "dummy"
         HorizSync    10-200
         VertRefresh  20-90
      EndSection
    • Add a new device section.

      Section "Device"
         BoardName    "dummy"
         Driver       "dummy"
         Identifier   "device_dummy"
         VendorName   "dummy"
         videoram    10000
      EndSection

      Note - You might need to adjust the videoram value, depending on the screen width, height, and color depth of your particular graphics card. The value in Kbytes must be large enough for the intended screen. For example, you can compute the value by using the formula width * height * bpp/8


    • Add a new screen section.

      Section "Screen"
         DefaultDepth 24
         SubSection "Display"
           Depth      24
           Modes      "1280x1024"
         EndSubSection
         Device       "device_dummy"
         Identifier   "screen_dummy"
         Monitor      "monitor_dummy"
      EndSection

      You might need to adjust the resolution value for your particular system setup.

  5. Look for the following line under the ServerLayout section:

    Screen   0  "Screen0" 0 0
  6. Insert the following line below the line in the previous step:

    Screen   1  "screen_dummy" RightOf "Screen0"

    This new line defines Screen1, a second dummy screen that is notionally to the right of Screen0, the physical and primary screen.

  7. Save the changes.

  8. Reboot the system from the appropriate command-line session:

    • If you are using GDM, perform the following:

      1. Type svcadm enable application/gdm2-login.

      2. Reboot the system.

    • If you are using dtlogin, reboot the system and log in.

  9. Start the Gnopernicus screen reader.

  10. Change the Startup Mode to Magnifier.

  11. Click Preferences, then select Magnifier.

  12. Click Add/Modify.

  13. Assign the following values for Magnifier preferences:

    • For Source: 0.1

    • For Zoomer Placement:

      • Left and Top: 0

      • Bottom and Right: maximum

  14. Click Apply.

    Because of the overlaying full-screen magnification zoomer, the Gnopernicus windows become invisible. However, full-screen magnification is now available.

x86: Problems Configuring USB Mouse Device as Extension Device for Use With GNOME On-Screen Keyboard

You cannot set up a USB mouse device as an extension device with the GOK. The configuration fails when you are setting up the USB mouse device while using a PS2 mouse device as the core pointer. To properly set up the USB mouse, follow these steps.

  1. Log in as superuser.

  2. While the USB mouse device is unplugged, type the following in a terminal window:

    # ls -l /dev/usb/hid*
  3. Connect the USB mouse and type the previous command again.

  4. Record the path of the USB mouse that is displayed on the screen.

  5. Log in to a command-line session.

    • If you are using the GNOME Display Manager, follow these steps:

      1. Log in to a session as superuser.

      2. At the prompt, type svcadm disable application/gdm2-login.

      3. Log in again as superuser.

    • If you are using dtlogin, follow these steps:

      1. In the dtlogin window, click Options and select Command Line Login.

      2. Log in as superuser.

  6. Create a new xorg.conf file.

    # /usr/X11/bin/Xorg -configure

    The command creates the file xorg.conf.new in the root (/) directory.

  7. Copy the new configuration file to the /etc/x11 directory and rename the file xorg.conf.

    # cp /xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf
  8. Modify the configurations in the file:

    • In the ServerLayout section, add an input device for Mouse1 after the line InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer". See the following example:

      InputDevice   "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
      InputDevice   "Mouse1"
    • In the InputDevice section that contains the line Identifier "Mouse0", apply the following changes:

      • Change Option "Device" "/dev/mouse" to Option "Device" "/dev/kdmouse"

      • Change Option "Protocol" "auto" to Option "Protocol" "VUID"

      • Add the following new Option:

        Option    "StreamsModule" "vuid3ps2"

      After you have applied the changes, the section should appear similar to the following example:

      Section "InputDevice"
         Identifier  "Mouse0"
         Driver      "mouse"
         Option      "Protocol" "VUID"
         Option      "Device" "/dev/kdmouse"
         Option      "StreamsModule" "vuid3ps2"
      EndSection
    • Create a new InputDevice section after the preceding InputDevice section:

      Section "InputDevice"
         Identifier  "Mouse1"
         Driver      "mouse"
            Option      "Device" "/dev/usb/hid1"
      EndSection

      Note - /dev/usb/hid1 is an example path for the USB mouse. Use the path in Step 4 to replace /dev/usb/hid1.


  9. Save the file and exit.

  10. Reboot the system from the appropriate command-line session:

    • If you are using GDM, perform the following:

      1. Type svcadm enable application/gdm2-login.

      2. Reboot the system.

    • If you are using dtlogin, reboot the system.

  11. Log in to the accessible UI user's account.

  12. Enable Assistive Technology Support by clicking Launch Menu => Preferences => Accessibility => Assistive Technology Support.

  13. Log out of the system then log in to the accessible UI user's account again.

  14. Open a terminal window and type the following command:

    % /usr/sfw/bin/gok --select-action=switch1
  15. In the GOK window, click GOK and select Preferences.

  16. If necessary, set up GOK to the accessible UI user's needs. Otherwise, to accept the current setup, click Apply then click OK in the GOK Preferences window.

  17. Exit GOK and then restart it by clicking Launch Menu => Applications => Accessibility => On-Screen Keyboard. The following warning message might be displayed:

    The device you are using to control GOK is
    also controlling the system pointer.
  18. Click OK.

  19. Exit GOK and then repeat steps 14-17.

    The warning message is no longer displayed.

Error Messages Displayed by pkgchk After You Remove Patches for Zones (6267966)

The patchadd and patchrm commands work improperly in non-global zones with inherited file systems. Consequently, in those zones, the pkgchk command might generate error messages about packages under the following circumstances:

  1. In the global zone, you apply patches for the Solaris 10 zone system by using the patchadd command.

  2. You use the patchrm command to remove patches that you just recently applied.

  3. In a non-global zone with inherited file systems, you check with the pkgchk command for information about a package in any of the removed patches.

The following sample message is displayed when the pkgchk command is used on SUNWcsu under the circumstances previously listed.

# pkgchk SUNWcsu
ERROR: /usr/lib/inet/certdb
   modtime <04/26/05 10:55:26 PM> expected <01/23/05 01:48:24 AM> actual
   file size <36012> expected <42152> actual
   file cksum <37098> expected <19747> actual
ERROR: /usr/lib/inet/certlocal
   modtime <04/26/05 10:55:26 PM> expected <01/23/05 01:48:24 AM> actual
   file size <44348> expected <84636> actual

Workaround: None. The errors are harmless. Ignore the error messages.

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