Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions
Privacy Policy

  




 

 

Writing Device Drivers
Previous Next

Driver Development Summary

This chapter and the following two chapters, Chapter 22, Debugging, Testing, and Tuning Device Drivers and Chapter 23, Recommended Coding Practices, provide detailed information on developing a device driver.

Take the following steps to build a device driver:

  1. Write, compile, and link the new code.

    See Driver Code Layout for the conventions on naming files. Use a C compiler to compile the driver. Link the driver using ld(1). See Compiling and Linking the Driver and Module Dependencies.

  2. Create the necessary hardware configuration files.

    Create a hardware configuration file unique to the device called xx.conf where xx is the prefix for the device. This file is used to update the driver.conf(4) file. See Writing a Hardware Configuration File. For a pseudo device driver, create a pseudo(4) file.

  3. Copy the driver to the appropriate module directory.

    See Copying the Driver to a Module Directory.

  4. Install the device driver using add_drv(1M).

    Installing the driver with add_drv is usually done as part of a postinstall script. See Installing Drivers with add_drv. Use the update_drv(1M) command to make any changes to the driver. See Updating Driver Information.

  5. Load the driver.

    The driver can be loaded automatically by accessing the device. See Loading and Unloading Drivers and Package Postinstall. Drivers can also be loaded by using the modload(1M) command. The modload command does not call any routines in the module and therefore is useful for testing. See Loading and Unloading Test Modules.

  6. Test the driver.

    Drivers should be rigorously tested in the following areas:

    For additional driver-specific testing, see Testing Specific Types of Drivers.

  7. Remove the driver if necessary.

    Use the rem_drv(1M) command to remove a device driver. See Removing the Driver and Package Preremove.

Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire