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Next: , Previous: Mode Line Mouse, Up: Frames


26.7 Creating Frames

The prefix key C-x 5 is analogous to C-x 4, with parallel subcommands. The difference is that C-x 5 commands create a new frame rather than just a new window in the selected frame (see Pop Up Window). If an existing visible or iconified frame already displays the requested material, these commands use the existing frame, after raising or deiconifying as necessary.

The various C-x 5 commands differ in how they find or create the buffer to select:

C-x 5 2
Create a new frame (make-frame-command).
C-x 5 b bufname <RET>
Select buffer bufname in another frame. This runs switch-to-buffer-other-frame.
C-x 5 f filename <RET>
Visit file filename and select its buffer in another frame. This runs find-file-other-frame. See Visiting.
C-x 5 d directory <RET>
Select a Dired buffer for directory directory in another frame. This runs dired-other-frame. See Dired.
C-x 5 m
Start composing a mail message in another frame. This runs mail-other-frame. It is the other-frame variant of C-x m. See Sending Mail.
C-x 5 .
Find a tag in the current tag table in another frame. This runs find-tag-other-frame, the multiple-frame variant of M-.. See Tags.
C-x 5 r filename <RET>
Visit file filename read-only, and select its buffer in another frame. This runs find-file-read-only-other-frame. See Visiting.

You can control the appearance of new frames you create by setting the frame parameters in default-frame-alist. You can use the variable initial-frame-alist to specify parameters that affect only the initial frame. See Initial Parameters, for more information.

The easiest way to specify the principal font for all your Emacs frames is with an X resource (see Font X), but you can also do it by modifying default-frame-alist to specify the font parameter, as shown here:

     (add-to-list 'default-frame-alist '(font . "10x20"))

Here's a similar example for specifying a foreground color:

     (add-to-list 'default-frame-alist '(foreground-color . "blue"))

 
 
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