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Next: , Previous: Concept Index, Up: Top


Acknowledgments

Many people have contributed code included in the Free Software Foundation's distribution of GNU Emacs. To show our appreciation for their public spirit, we list here in alphabetical order those who have written substantial portions.

  • Per Abrahamsen wrote the customization buffer facilities, as well as double.el for typing accented characters not normally available from the keyboard, xt-mouse.el which handles mouse commands through Xterm, gnus-cus.el which implements customization commands for Gnus, gnus-cite.el, a citation-parsing facility for news articles and cpp.el which hides or highlights parts of C programs according to preprocessor conditionals.
  • Tomas Abrahamsson wrote artist.el, a package for producing ASCII art with a mouse or with keyboard keys.
  • Jay K. Adams wrote jka-compr.el, providing automatic decompression and recompression for compressed files.
  • Joe Arceneaux wrote the original text property implementation, and implemented support for X11.
  • Miles Bader wrote image-file.el, support code for visiting image files, minibuf-eldef.el, a minor mode whereby the default value is shown in the minibuffer prompt only when appropriate, and button.el, the library that implements clickable buttons.
  • David Bakhash wrote strokes.el, a mode for controlling Emacs by moving the mouse in particular patterns.
  • Eli Barzilay wrote calculator.el, a desktop calculator for Emacs.
  • Steven L. Baur wrote footnote.el which lets you include footnotes in email messages, and gnus-audio.el which provides sound effects for Gnus.
  • Boaz Ben-Zvi wrote profile.el, to time Emacs Lisp functions.
  • Ray Blaak wrote delphi.el, a major mode for editing Delphi (Object Pascal) source code.
  • Jim Blandy wrote Emacs 19's input system, brought its configuration and build process up to the GNU coding standards, and contributed to the frame support and multi-face support. Jim also wrote tvi970.el, terminal support for the TeleVideo 970 terminals.
  • Per Bothner wrote term.el, a terminal emulator in an Emacs buffer.
  • Terrence M. Brannon wrote landmark.el, a neural-network robot that learns landmarks.
  • Frank Bresz wrote diff.el, a program to display diff output.
  • Peter Breton implemented:
    • dirtrack which does better tracking of directory changes in shell buffers,
    • filecache.el which records which directories your files are in,
    • locate.el which interfaces to the locate command,
    • find-lisp.el, an Emacs Lisp emulation of the find program,
    • net-utils.el, and
    • the “generic mode” feature.
  • Emmanuel Briot wrote xml.el, an XML parser for Emacs.
  • Kevin Broadey wrote foldout.el, providing folding extensions to Emacs's outline modes.
  • David M. Brown wrote array.el, for editing arrays and other tabular data.
  • W/lodek Bzyl and Ryszard Kubiak wrote ogonek.el, a package for changing the encoding of Polish characters.
  • Bill Carpenter provided feedmail.el, a package for massaging outgoing mail messages and sending them through various popular mailers.
  • Per Cederqvist and Inge Wallin wrote ewoc.el, an Emacs widget for manipulating object collections.
  • Hans Chalupsky wrote advice.el, an overloading mechanism for Emacs Lisp functions, and trace.el, a tracing facility for Emacs Lisp.
  • Chris Chase and Carsten Dominik wrote idlwave.el, an editing mode for IDL and WAVE CL.
  • Bob Chassell wrote texnfo-upd.el and makeinfo.el, modes and utilities for working with Texinfo files; and page-ext.el, commands for extended page handling.
  • Andrew Choi wrote the Macintosh support code, and contributed mac-win.el, support for the Mac window system.
  • James Clark wrote sgml-mode.el, a mode for editing SGML documents, and contributed to Emacs's dumping procedures.
  • Mike Clarkson wrote edt.el, an emulation of DEC's EDT editor.
  • Glynn Clements provided gamegrid.el and a couple of games that use it, Snake and Tetris.
  • Georges Brun-Cottan and Stefan Monnier wrote easy-mmode.el, a package for easy definition of major and minor modes.
  • Andrew Csillag wrote M4 mode (m4-mode.el).
  • Doug Cutting and Jamie Zawinski wrote disass.el, a disassembler for compiled Emacs Lisp code.
  • Michael DeCorte wrote emacs.csh, a C-shell script that starts a new Emacs job, or restarts a paused Emacs if one exists.
  • Gary Delp wrote mailpost.el, an interface between RMAIL and the /usr/uci/post mailer.
  • Matthieu Devin wrote delsel.el, a package to make newly-typed text replace the current selection.
  • Eric Ding contributed goto-addr.el,
  • Jan Djärv added support for the GTK+ toolkit and X drag-and-drop.
  • Carsten Dominik wrote reftex.el, a package for setting up labels and cross-references in LaTeX documents, and org.el, a mode for maintaining notes, todo lists, and project planning.
  • Scott Draves wrote tq.el, help functions for maintaining transaction queues between Emacs and its subprocesses.
  • Benjamin Drieu wrote pong.el, an implementation of the classical pong game.
  • Viktor Dukhovni wrote support for dumping under SunOS version 4.
  • John Eaton co-wrote Octave mode.
  • Rolf Ebert co-wrote Ada mode (ada-mode.el).
  • Stephen Eglen implemented mspools.el, for use with Procmail, which tells you which mail folders have mail waiting in them, and iswitchb.el, a feature for incremental reading and completion of buffer names.
  • Torbjörn Einarsson contributed the Fortran 90 mode (f90.el).
  • Tsugutomo Enami co-wrote the support for international character sets.
  • Hans Henrik Eriksen wrote simula.el, a mode for editing SIMULA 87 code.
  • Michael Ernst wrote reposition.el, a command for recentering a function's source code and preceding comment on the screen.
  • Ata Etemadi wrote cdl.el, functions for working with Common Data Language source code.
  • Frederick Farnbach implemented morse.el, which converts text to Morse code.
  • Oscar Figueiredo wrote EUDC, the Emacs Unified Directory Client, which is an interface to directory servers via LDAP, CCSO PH/QI, or BBDB; and ldap.el, the LDAP client interface.
  • Fred Fish wrote the support for dumping COFF executable files.
  • Karl Fogel wrote:
    • bookmark.el, for creating named placeholders, saving them and jumping to them later,
    • mail-hist.el, a history mechanism for outgoing mail messages, and
    • saveplace.el, for preserving point's location in files between editing sessions.
  • Gary Foster wrote crisp.el, the emulation for CRiSP and Brief editors, and scroll-lock.el (now scroll-all.el) a mode for scrolling several buffers together.
  • Noah Friedman wrote rlogin.el, an interface to Rlogin, type-break.el, which reminds you to take periodic breaks from typing, and eldoc-mode, a mode to show the defined parameters or the doc string for the Lisp function near point. With Roland McGrath, he wrote rsz-mini.el, a minor mode to automatically resize the minibuffer to fit the text it contains.
  • Keith Gabryelski wrote hexl.el, a mode for editing binary files.
  • Kevin Gallagher rewrote and enhanced the EDT emulation, and wrote flow-ctrl.el, a package for coping with unsuppressible XON/XOFF flow control.
  • Kevin Gallo added multiple-frame support for Windows NT and wrote w32-win.el, support functions for the MS-Windows window system.
  • Juan León Lahoz García wrote wdired.el, a package for performing file operations by directly editing Dired buffers.
  • Howard Gayle wrote:
    • the C and lisp code for display tables and case tables,
    • rot13.el, a command to display the plain-text form of a buffer encoded with the Caesar cipher,
    • case-table.el, code to extend the character set and support case tables,
    • much of the support for the ISO-8859 European character sets (which includes iso-ascii.el, iso-insert.el, iso-swed.el, latin-1.el, iso-syntax.el, iso-transl.el, swedish.el), and
    • vt100-led.el, a package for controlling the LED's on VT100-compatible terminals.
  • Stephen Gildea made the Emacs quick reference card, and made many contributions for time-stamp.el, a package for maintaining last-change time stamps in files.
  • Julien Gilles wrote gnus-ml.el, a mailing list minor mode for Gnus.
  • David Gillespie wrote:
    • The Common Lisp compatibility packages,
    • Calc, an advanced calculator and mathematical tool,
    • complete.el, a partial completion mechanism, and
    • edmacro.el, a package for editing keyboard macros.
  • Bob Glickstein contributed the sregex.el feature, a facility for writing regexps using a Lisp-like syntax.
  • Boris Goldowsky wrote:
    • avoid.el, a package to keep the mouse cursor out of the way of the text cursor,
    • shadowfile.el, a package for keeping identical copies of files in more than one place,
    • format.el, a package for reading and writing files in various formats,
    • enriched.el, a package for saving text properties in files, and
    • facemenu.el, a package for specifying faces.
  • Michelangelo Grigni wrote ffap.el which visits a file, taking the file name from the buffer.
  • Odd Gripenstam wrote dcl-mode.el for editing DCL command files.
  • Kai Großjohann wrote the Tramp package, which provides transparent remote file editing using rcp, ssh, and other network protocols.
  • Michael Gschwind wrote iso-cvt.el, a package to convert between the ISO 8859-1 character set and the notations for non-ASCII characters used by TeX and net tradition, and latin-2.el, code which sets up case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-2 character set.
  • Henry Guillaume wrote find-file.el, a package to visit files related to the currently visited file.
  • Doug Gwyn wrote the portable alloca implementation.
  • Ken'ichi Handa implemented most of the support for international character sets, and wrote isearch-x.el, a facility for searching non-ASCII text. Together with Naoto Takahashi, he wrote quail.el, a simple input facility for typing non-ASCII text from an ASCII keyboard. Ken'ichi also wrote ps-bdf.el, a BDF font support for printing non-ASCII text on a PostScript printer.
  • Chris Hanson wrote netuname.el, a package to use HP-UX's Remote File Access facility from Emacs.
  • K. Shane Hartman wrote:
    • chistory.el and echistory.el, packages for browsing command history lists,
    • electric.el and helper.el, providing an alternative command loop and appropriate help facilities,
    • emacsbug.el, a package for reporting Emacs bugs,
    • picture.el, a mode for editing ASCII pictures, and
    • view.el, a package for perusing files and buffers without editing them.
  • John Heidemann wrote mouse-copy.el and mouse-drag.el, which provide alternative mouse-based editing and scrolling features. He also contributed zone-mode.el, a major mode for editing DNS zone files.
  • Jon K Hellan wrote utf7.el, support for mail-safe transformation format of Unicode.
  • Markus Heritsch co-wrote Ada mode (ada-mode.el).
  • Karl Heuer wrote the original blessmail script, implemented the intangible text property, and rearranged the structure of the Lisp_Object type to allow for more data bits.
  • Manabu Higashida ported Emacs to MS-DOS.
  • Anders Holst wrote hippie-exp.el, a versatile completion and expansion package.
  • Kurt Hornik co-wrote Octave mode.
  • Tom Houlder wrote mantemp.el, which generates manual C++ template instantiations.
  • Denis Howe wrote browse-url.el, a package for invoking a WWW browser to display a URL.
  • Lars Magne Ingebrigtsen did a major redesign of the Gnus news-reader and wrote many of its parts.
  • Andrew Innes contributed extensively to the MS-Windows support.
  • Seiichiro Inoue improved Emacs's XIM support.
  • Ulf Jasper wrote icalendar.el, a package for converting Emacs diary entries to and from the iCalendar format.
  • Kyle Jones wrote life.el, a package to play Conway's “life” game, and mldrag.el, a package which allows the user to resize windows by dragging mode lines and vertical window separators with the mouse.
  • Terry Jones wrote shadow.el, a package for finding potential load-path problems when some Lisp file “shadows” another.
  • Simon Josefsson wrote:
    • dns-mode.el, an editing mode for Domain Name System master files,
    • flow-fill.el, a package for interpreting RFC2646 formatted text in messages,
    • fringe.el, a package for customizing the fringe,
    • imap.el, an Emacs Lisp library for talking to IMAP servers,
    • nnimap, the IMAP back-end for Gnus, and
    • rfc2104.el, a hashed message authentication facility.
  • Tomoji Kagatani implemented smtpmail.el, used for sending out mail with SMTP.
  • David Kaufman wrote yow.c, an essential utility program for the hopelessly pinheaded.
  • Henry Kautz wrote bib-mode.el, a mode for maintaining bibliography databases compatible with refer (the troff version) and lookbib, and refbib.el, a package to convert those databases to the format used by the LaTeX text formatting package.
  • Taichi Kawabata added support for Devanagari script and the Indian languages.
  • Howard Kaye wrote sort.el, commands to sort text in Emacs buffers.
  • Michael Kifer wrote ediff.el, an interactive interface to the diff, patch, and merge programs, and Viper, the newest emulation for VI.
  • Richard King wrote the first version of userlock.el and filelock.c, which provide simple support for multiple users editing the same file. He also wrote the initial version of uniquify.el, a facility to make buffer names unique by adding parts of the file's name to the buffer name.
  • Peter Kleiweg wrote ps-mode.el, a major mode for editing PostScript files and running a PostScript interpreter interactively from within Emacs.
  • Pavel Kobiakov wrote flymake.el, a minor mode for performing on-the-fly syntax checking.
  • Larry K. Kolodney wrote cvtmail.c, a program to convert the mail directories used by Gosling Emacs into RMAIL format.
  • David M. Koppelman wrote hi-lock.el, a minor mode for interactive automatic highlighting of parts of the buffer text.
  • Koseki Yoshinori wrote iinline.el, a minor mode for displaying inline images.
  • Robert Krawitz wrote the original xmenu.c, part of Emacs's pop-up menu support.
  • Sebastian Kremer wrote Emacs 19's dired-mode, with contributions by Lawrence R. Dodd. He also wrote ls-lisp.el, a Lisp emulation of the ls command for platforms which don't have ls as a standard program.
  • Geoff Kuenning wrote Emacs 19's ispell.el, based on work by Ken Stevens and others.
  • David Ka*gedal wrote tempo.el, providing support for easy insertion of boilerplate text and other common constructions.
  • Daniel LaLiberte wrote:
    • edebug.el, a source-level debugger for Emacs Lisp,
    • cl-specs.el, specifications to help edebug debug code written using David Gillespie's Common Lisp support,
    • cust-print.el, a customizable package for printing lisp objects,
    • eval-reg.el, a re-implementation of eval-region in Emacs Lisp, and
    • isearch.el, Emacs's incremental search minor mode.
  • James R. Larus wrote mh-e.el, an interface to the MH mail system.
  • Vinicius Jose Latorre wrote the Emacs printing facilities, as well as:
    • ps-print, a package for pretty-printing Emacs buffers to PostScript printers,
    • delim-col.el, a package to arrange text into columns,
    • ebnf2ps.el, a package that translates EBNF grammar to a syntactic chart that can be printed to a PostScript printer.
  • Frederic Lepied contributed expand.el, which uses the abbrev mechanism for inserting programming constructs.
  • Peter Liljenberg wrote elint.el, a Lint-style code checker for Emacs Lisp programs.
  • Lars Lindberg wrote msb.el, which provides more flexible menus for buffer selection, and rewrote dabbrev.el.
  • Anders Lindgren wrote autorevert.el, a package for automatically reverting files visited by Emacs that were changed on disk; cwarn.el, a package to highlight suspicious C and C++ constructs; and follow.el, a minor mode to synchronize windows that show the same buffer.
  • Thomas Link wrote filesets.el, a package for handling sets of files.
  • Dave Love wrote much of the code dealing with Unicode support and Latin-N unification. He added support for many coding systems, including those in code-pages.el and the various UTF-7 and UTF-16 coding systems. He also wrote:
    • autoarg-mode, a global minor mode whereby digit keys supply prefix arguments, and autoarg-kp-mode which redefines the keypad numeric keys to digit arguments,
    • autoconf.el, a mode for editing Autoconf configure.in files,
    • cfengine.el, a mode for editing Cfengine files,
    • elide-head.el, a package for eliding boilerplate text, such as copyright notices, from file headers,
    • hl-line.el, a package that provides a minor mode for highlighting the line in the current window on which point is,
    • latin-8.el and latin-9.el, code which sets up case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-8 and Latin-9 character sets,
    • latin1-disp.el, a package that lets you display ISO 8859 characters on Latin-1 terminals by setting up appropriate display tables,
    • python.el, a major mode for the Python programming language.
    • refill.el, a mode for automatic paragraph refilling, akin to typical word processors,
    • smiley-ems.el, a facility for displaying smiley faces, and
    • tool-bar.el, a mode to control the display of the Emacs tool bar.
  • Eric Ludlam wrote the Speedbar package and checkdoc.el, a package for checking doc strings in Emacs Lisp programs.
  • Alan Mackenzie wrote the integrated AWK support in CC Mode.
  • Christopher J. Madsen wrote decipher.el, a package for cracking simple substitution ciphers.
  • Neil M. Mager wrote appt.el, functions to notify users of their appointments. It finds appointments recorded in the diary files generated by Edward M. Reingold's calendar package.
  • Ken Manheimer wrote allout.el, a mode for manipulating and formatting outlines, and icomplete.el, which provides incremental completion feedback in the minibuffer.
  • Bill Mann wrote perl-mode.el, a mode for editing Perl code.
  • Brian Marick and Daniel LaLiberte wrote hideif.el, support for hiding selected code within C #ifdef clauses.
  • Simon Marshall wrote regexp-opt.el, which generates a regular expression from a list of strings. He also extended comint.el, originally written by Olin Shivers.
  • Bengt Martensson, Mark Shapiro, Mike Newton, Aaron Larson, and Stefan Schoef, wrote bibtex.el, a mode for editing BibTeX bibliography files.
  • Charlie Martin wrote autoinsert.el, which provides automatic mode-sensitive insertion of text into new files.
  • Thomas May wrote blackbox.el, a version of the traditional blackbox game.
  • Roland McGrath wrote:
    • compile.el, a package for running compilations in a buffer, and then visiting the locations reported in error messages,
    • etags.el, a package for jumping to function definitions and searching or replacing in all the files mentioned in a TAGS file,
    • find-dired.el, for using dired commands on output from the find program, with Sebastian Kremer,
    • map-ynp.el, a general purpose boolean question-asker,
    • autoload.el, providing semi-automatic maintenance of autoload files, and
    • upd-copyr.el, providing semi-automatic maintenance of copyright notices in source code.
  • David Megginson wrote derived.el, which allows one to define new major modes by inheriting key bindings and commands from existing major modes.
  • Will Mengarini wrote repeat.el, a command to repeat the preceding command with its arguments.
  • Wayne Mesard wrote hscroll.el which does horizontal scrolling automatically.
  • Brad Miller wrote gnus-gl.el, a Gnus interface for GroupLens.
  • Richard Mlynarik wrote:
    • cl-indent.el, a package for indenting Common Lisp code,
    • ebuff-menu.el, an “electric” browser for buffer listings,
    • ehelp.el, bindings for browsing help screens,
    • rfc822.el, a parser for E-mail addresses in the RFC-822 format, used in mail messages and news articles,
    • terminal.el, a terminal emulator for Emacs subprocesses, and
    • yow.el, an essential utility (try M-x yow).
  • Gerd Moellmann was the Emacs maintainer from the beginning of Emacs 21 development until the release of 21.1. He wrote:
    • the new display engine for Emacs 21,
    • the asynchronous timers facility (atimer.c),
    • the ebrowse C++ browser,
    • jit-lock.el, the Just-In-Time font-lock support mode,
    • tooltip.el, a package for displaying tooltips, and
    • authors.el package for maintaining the AUTHORS files.
  • Stefan Monnier added support for Arch, Subversion, and Meta-CVS to VC, and re-wrote much of the Emacs server to use the built-in networking primitives. He also wrote:
    • PCL-CVS, a directory-level front end to the CVS version control system,
    • reveal.el, a minor mode for automatically revealing invisible text,
    • smerge-mode.el, a minor mode for resolving diff3 conflicts, and
    • diff-mode.el, a mode for viewing and editing context diffs.
  • Morioka Tomohiko wrote several packages for MIME support in Gnus and elsewhere.
  • Sen Nagata wrote crm.el, a package for reading multiple strings with completion, and rfc2368.el, support for mailto: URLs.
  • Erik Naggum wrote the time-conversion functions. He also wrote disp-table.el, a package for dealing with display tables, latin-4.el and latin-5.el, code which sets up case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-4 and Latin-5 character sets, mailheader.el, a package for parsing email headers, and parse-time.el, a package for parsing time strings.
  • Thomas Neumann and Eric Raymond wrote makefile.el (now make-mode.el), a mode for editing makefiles.
  • Thien-Thi Nguyen and Dan Nicolaescu wrote hideshow.el, a minor mode for selectively displaying blocks of text.
  • Dan Nicolaescu wrote romanian.el, support for editing Romanian text, and iris-ansi.el, support for running Emacs on SGI's xwsh and winterm terminal emulators.
  • Jurgen Nickelsen wrote ws-mode.el, providing WordStar emulation.
  • Jeff Norden wrote kermit.el, a package to help the Kermit dialup communications program run comfortably in an Emacs shell buffer.
  • Andrew Norman wrote ange-ftp.el, providing transparent FTP support.
  • Alexandre Oliva wrote gnus-mlspl.el, a group params-based mail splitting mechanism.
  • Takaaki Ota wrote table.el, a package for creating and editing embedded text-based tables.
  • Pieter E. J. Pareit wrote mixal-mode.el, an editing mode for the MIX assembly language.
  • David Pearson contributed quickurl.el, a simple method of inserting a URL into the current buffer based on text at point; 5x5.el, a game to fill all squares on the field.
  • Jeff Peck wrote:
    • emacstool.c, support for running Emacs under SunView/Sun Windows,
    • sun.el, key bindings for sunterm keys,
    • sun-curs.el, cursor definitions for Sun Windows, and
    • sun-fns.el and sun-mouse.el, providing mouse support for Sun Windows.
  • Damon Anton Permezel wrote hanoi.el, an animated demonstration of the “Towers of Hanoi” puzzle.
  • William M. Perry wrote mailcap.el, a MIME media types configuration facility, mwheel.el, a package for supporting mouse wheels, and the URL package.
  • Per Persson wrote gnus-vm.el, the VM interface for Gnus.
  • Jens Petersen wrote find-func.el, which makes it easy to find the source code for an Emacs Lisp function or variable.
  • Daniel Pfeiffer wrote:
    • conf-mode.el, a major mode for editing configuration files,
    • copyright.el, a package for updating copyright notices in files,
    • executable.el, a package for executing interpreter scripts,
    • sh-script.el, a mode for editing shell scripts,
    • skeleton.el, implementing a concise language for writing statement skeletons, and
    • two-column.el, a minor mode for simultaneous two-column editing.

    Daniel also rewrote apropos.el, originally written by Joe Wells, and, together with Jim Blandy, co-authored wyse50.el, support for Wyse 50 terminals.

  • Richard L. Pieri wrote pop3.el, a Post Office Protocol (RFC 1460) interface for Emacs.
  • Fred Pierresteguy and Paul Reilly made Emacs work with X Toolkit widgets.
  • Christian Plaunt wrote soundex.el, an implementation of the Soundex algorithm for comparing English words by their pronunciation.
  • David Ponce wrote recentf.el, a package that puts a menu of recently visited files in the Emacs menu bar, and ruler-mode.el, a minor mode for displaying a ruler in the header line.
  • Francesco A. Potorti wrote cmacexp.el, providing a command which runs the C preprocessor on a region of a file and displays the results. He also expanded and redesigned the etags program.
  • Michael D. Prange and Steven A. Wood wrote fortran.el, a mode for editing FORTRAN code.
  • Mukesh Prasad contributed vmsproc.el, a facility for running asynchronous subprocesses on VMS.
  • Marko Rahamaa wrote latin-3.el, code which sets up case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-3 character set.
  • Ashwin Ram wrote refer.el, commands to look up references in bibliography files by keyword.
  • Eric S. Raymond wrote:
    • vc.el, an interface to the RCS and SCCS source code version control systems, with Paul Eggert,
    • gud.el, a package for running source-level debuggers like GDB and SDB in Emacs,
    • asm-mode.el, a mode for editing assembly language code,
    • AT386.el, terminal support package for IBM's AT keyboards,
    • cookie1.el, support for “fortune-cookie” programs like yow.el and spook.el,
    • finder.el, a package for finding Emacs Lisp packages by keyword and topic,
    • keyswap.el, code to swap the <BS> and <DEL> keys,
    • loadhist.el, functions for loading and unloading Emacs features,
    • lisp-mnt.el, functions for working with the special headers used in Emacs Lisp library files, and
    • code to set and make use of the load-history lisp variable, which records the source file from which each lisp function loaded into Emacs came.
  • Edward M. Reingold wrote the extensive calendar and diary support (try M-x calendar), with contributions from Stewart Clamen, Nachum Dershowitz, Paul Eggert, Steve Fisk, Michael Kifer, and Lara Rios. Andy Oram contributed to its documentation. Reingold has also contributed to tex-mode.el, a mode for editing TeX files, as have William F. Schelter, Dick King, Stephen Gildea, Michael Prange, and Jacob Gore.
  • Alex Rezinsky contributed which-func.el, a mode that shows the name of the current function in the mode line.
  • Rob Riepel contributed tpu-edt.el and its associated files, providing an emulation of the VMS TPU text editor emulating the VMS EDT editor, and vt-control.el, providing some control functions for the DEC VT line of terminals.
  • Nick Roberts wrote gdb-ui.el, the graphical user interface to GDB.
  • Roland B. Roberts contributed much of the VMS support distributed with Emacs 19, along with Joseph M. Kelsey, and vms-pmail.el, support for using Emacs within VMS MAIL.
  • John Robinson wrote bg-mouse.el, support for the mouse on the BBN Bitgraph terminal.
  • Danny Roozendaal implemented handwrite.el, which converts text into “handwriting.”
  • William Rosenblatt wrote float.el, implementing a floating-point numeric type using Lisp cons cells and integers.
  • Guillermo J. Rozas wrote scheme.el, a mode for editing Scheme and DSSSL code, and fakemail.c, an interface to the System V mailer.
  • Ivar Rummelhoff provided winner.el, which records recent window configurations so you can move back to them.
  • Jason Rumney has ported the Emacs 21 display engine to MS-Windows, and contributed extensively to the MS-Windows port of Emacs.
  • Wolfgang Rupprecht contributed Emacs 19's floating-point support (including float-sup.el and floatfns.c), and sup-mouse.el, support for the Supdup mouse on lisp machines.
  • Kevin Ryde wrote info-xref.el, a library for checking references in Info files.
  • James B. Salem and Brewster Kahle wrote completion.el, providing dynamic word completion.
  • Masahiko Sato wrote vip.el, an emulation of the VI editor.
  • Holger Schauer wrote fortune.el, a package for using fortune in message signatures.
  • William Schelter wrote telnet.el, support for telnet sessions within Emacs.
  • Ralph Schleicher contributed battery.el, a package for displaying laptop computer battery status, and info-look.el, a package for looking up Info documentation for symbols in the buffer.
  • Michael Schmidt and Tom Perrine wrote modula2.el, a mode for editing Modula-2 code, based on work by Mick Jordan and Peter Robinson.
  • Ronald S. Schnell wrote dunnet.el, a text adventure game.
  • Philippe Schnoebelen wrote gomoku.el, a Go Moku game played against Emacs, and mpuz.el, a multiplication puzzle.
  • Jan Schormann wrote solitaire.el, an Emacs Lisp implementation of the Solitaire game.
  • Alex Schroeder wrote ansi-color.el, a package for translating ANSI color escape sequences to Emacs faces, and sql.el, a package for interactively running an SQL interpreter in an Emacs buffer.
  • Randal Schwartz wrote pp.el, a pretty-printer for lisp objects.
  • Oliver Seidel wrote todo-mode.el, a package for maintaining TODO list files.
  • Manuel Serrano contributed the Flyspell package that does spell checking as you type.
  • Hovav Shacham wrote windmove.el, a set of commands for selecting windows based on their geometrical position on the frame.
  • Stanislav Shalunov wrote uce.el, for responding to unsolicited commercial email.
  • Richard Sharman contributed hilit-chg.el, which uses colors to show recent editing changes.
  • Olin Shivers wrote:
    • comint.el, a library for modes running interactive command-line- oriented subprocesses,
    • cmuscheme.el, for running inferior Scheme processes,
    • inf-lisp.el, for running inferior Lisp process, and
    • shell.el, for running inferior shells.
  • Espen Skoglund wrote pascal.el, a mode for editing Pascal code.
  • Rick Sladkey wrote backquote.el, a lisp macro for creating mostly-constant data.
  • Lynn Slater wrote help-macro.el, a macro for writing interactive help for key bindings.
  • Chris Smith wrote icon.el, a mode for editing Icon code.
  • David Smith wrote ielm.el, a mode for interacting with the Emacs Lisp interpreter as a subprocess.
  • Paul D. Smith wrote snmp-mode.el.
  • William Sommerfeld wrote scribe.el, a mode for editing Scribe files, and server.el, a package allowing programs to send files to an extant Emacs job to be edited.
  • Andre Spiegel made many contributions to the Emacs Version Control package, and in particular made it support multiple back ends.
  • Michael Staats wrote pc-select.el, which rebinds keys for selecting regions to follow many other systems.
  • Richard Stallman invented Emacs, and then wrote:
    • easymenu.el, a facility for defining Emacs menus,
    • menu-bar.el, the Emacs menu bar support code,
    • paren.el, a package to make matching parentheses stand out in color, and
    • most of the rest of Emacs code.
  • Sam Steingold wrote gulp.el, a facility for asking package maintainers for updated versions of their packages via e-mail, and midnight.el, a package for running a command every midnight.
  • Ake Stenhoff and Lars Lindberg wrote imenu.el, a framework for browsing indices made from buffer contents.
  • Peter Stephenson contributed vcursor.el, which implements a “virtual cursor” that you can move with the keyboard and use for copying text.
  • Ken Stevens wrote the initial version of ispell.el and maintains that package since Ispell 3.1 release.
  • Jonathan Stigelman wrote hilit19.el, a package providing automatic highlighting in source code buffers, mail readers, and other contexts.
  • Kim F. Storm made many improvements to the Emacs display engine, process support, and networking support. He also wrote:
    • bindat.el, a package for encoding and decoding binary data.
    • cua.el, which allows Emacs to emulate the standard CUA key bindings.
    • ido.el, a package for selecting buffers and files quickly.
    • kmacro.el, the keyboard macro facility.
  • Martin Stjernholm co-authored CC Mode, a major editing mode for C, C++, Objective-C, Java, Pike, CORBA IDL, and AWK code.
  • Steve Strassman did not write spook.el, and even if he did, he really didn't mean for you to use it in an anarchistic way.
  • Olaf Sylvester wrote bs.el, a package for manipulating Emacs buffers.
  • Tibor S<imko and Milan Zamazal wrote slovak.el, support for editing text in Slovak language.
  • Naoto Takahashi wrote utf-8.el, support for encoding and decoding UTF-8 data.
  • Jean-Philippe Theberge wrote thumbs.el, a package for viewing image files as “thumbnails”.
  • Jens T. Berger Thielemann wrote word-help.el, which is part of the basis for info-look.el.
  • Spencer Thomas wrote the original dabbrev.el, providing a command which completes the partial word before point, based on other nearby words for which it is a prefix. He also wrote the original dumping support.
  • Jim Thompson wrote ps-print.el, which converts Emacs text to Postscript.
  • Tom Tromey and Chris Lindblad wrote tcl.el, a major mode for editing Tcl/Tk source files and running a Tcl interpreter as an Emacs subprocess.
  • Daiki Ueno wrote starttls.el, support for Transport Layer Security protocol.
  • Masanobu Umeda wrote:
    • GNUS, a feature-full reader for Usenet news,
    • prolog.el, a mode for editing Prolog code,
    • rmailsort.el, a package for sorting messages in RMAIL folders,
    • metamail.el, an interface to the Metamail program,
    • gnus-kill.el, the Kill File mode for Gnus,
    • gnus-mh.el, an mh-e interface for Gnus,
    • gnus-msg.el, a mail and post interface for Gnus,
    • tcp.el, emulation of the open-network-stream function for some Emacs configurations which lack it, and
    • timezone.el, providing functions for dealing with time zones.
  • Rajesh Vaidheeswarran wrote whitespace.el, a package that detects and cleans up excess whitespace in a file.
  • Neil W. Van Dyke wrote webjump.el, a “hot links” package.
  • Didier Verna contributed rect.el, a package of functions for operations on rectangle regions of text.
  • Ulrik Vieth implemented meta-mode.el, for editing MetaFont code.
  • Geoffrey Voelker wrote the Windows NT support. He also wrote dos-w32.el, functions shared by the MS-DOS and MS-Windows ports of Emacs, and w32-fns.el, MS-Windows specific support functions.
  • Johan Vromans wrote forms.el and its associated files, a mode for filling in forms.
  • Colin Walters wrote ibuffer.el, a Dired-like major mode for operating on buffers.
  • Barry Warsaw wrote:
    • assoc.el, a set of utility functions for working with association lists,
    • cc-mode.el, a major mode for editing C, C++, and Java code, based on earlier work by Dave Detlefs, Stewart Clamen, and Richard Stallman,
    • elp.el, a new profiler for Emacs Lisp programs.
    • man.el, a mode for reading UNIX manual pages,
    • regi.el, providing an AWK-like functionality for use in lisp programs,
    • reporter.el, providing customizable bug reporting for lisp packages, and
    • supercite.el, a minor mode for quoting sections of mail messages and news articles.
  • Morten Welinder introduced face support into the MS-DOS port of Emacs, and also wrote:
    • desktop.el, facilities for saving some of Emacs's state between sessions,
    • timer.el, the Emacs facility to run commands at a given time or frequency, or when Emacs is idle, and its C-level support code,
    • pc-win.el, the MS-DOS “window-system” support,
    • internal.el, an “internal terminal” emulator for the MS-DOS port of Emacs,
    • arc-mode.el, the mode for editing compressed archives,
    • s-region.el, commands for setting the region using the shift key and motion commands, and
    • dos-fns.el, functions for use under MS-DOS.

    He also helped port Emacs to MS-DOS.

  • Joseph Brian Wells wrote:
    • apropos.el, a command to find commands, functions, and variables whose names contain matches for a regular expression,
    • resume.el, support for processing command-line arguments after resuming a suspended Emacs job, and
    • mail-extr.el, a package for extracting names and addresses from mail headers, with contributions from Jamie Zawinski.
  • Rodney Whitby and Reto Zimmermann wrote vhdl-mode.el, a major mode for editing VHDL source code.
  • John Wiegley wrote align.el, a set of commands for aligning text according to regular-expression based rules; timeclock.el, a package for keeping track of time spent on projects; pcomplete.el, a programmable completion facility; and eshell, a command shell implemented entirely in Emacs Lisp.
  • Ed Wilkinson wrote b2m.c, a program to convert mail files from RMAIL format to Unix mbox format.
  • Mike Williams wrote mouse-sel.el, providing enhanced mouse selection, and thingatpt.el, a library of functions for finding the “thing” (word, line, s-expression) containing point.
  • Bill Wohler wrote the Emacs interface to the MH mail system.
  • Dale R. Worley wrote emerge.el, a package for interactively merging two versions of a file.
  • Francis J. Wright wrote WoMan, a package for browsing manual pages without the man command.
  • Tom Wurgler wrote emacs-lock.el, which makes it harder to exit with valuable buffers unsaved.
  • Masatake Yamato wrote ld-script.el, an editing mode for GNU linker scripts.
  • Jonathan Yavner wrote testcover.el, a package for keeping track of the testing status of Emacs Lisp code, and the SES spreadsheet package.
  • Ilya Zakharevich and Bob Olson contributed cperl-mode.el, a major mode for editing Perl code. Ilya Zakharevich also wrote tmm.el, a mode for accessing the Emacs menu bar on a text-mode terminal.
  • Milan Zamazal wrote czech.el, support for editing Czech text, glasses.el, a package for easier reading of source code which uses illegible identifier names such as cantReadThisVariable, and tildify.el, commands for adding hard spaces to text, TeX, and SGML/HTML files.
  • Victor Zandy contributed zone.el, a package for people who like to zone out in front of Emacs.
  • Eli Zaretskii made many standard Emacs features work on MS-DOS. He also wrote tty-colors.el, which implements transparent mapping of X colors to tty colors, and (together with Kenichi Handa) codepage.el, a package for editing text encoded in DOS/Windows code pages.
  • Jamie Zawinski wrote:
    • Emacs 19's optimizing byte compiler, with Hallvard Furuseth,
    • much of the support for faces and X selections,
    • mailabbrev.el, a package providing automatic expansion of mail aliases, and
    • tar-mode.el, providing simple viewing and editing commands for tar files.
  • Andrew Zhilin created the Emacs icons used beginning with Emacs 22.
  • Shenghuo Zhu wrote:
    • binhex.el, a package for reading and writing binhex files,
    • mm-partial.el, message/partial support for MIME messages,
    • rfc1843.el, an HZ decoding package,
    • uudecode.el, an Emacs Lisp decoder for uuencoded data,
    • webmail.el, an interface to Web mail.
  • Ian T. Zimmerman wrote gametree.el.
  • Neal Ziring and Felix S. T. Wu wrote vi.el, an emulation of the VI text editor.
  • Detlev Zundel wrote re-builder.el, a package for building regexps with visual feedback.

Others too numerous to mention have reported and fixed bugs, and added features to many parts of Emacs. (Many are mentioned in the ChangeLog files which are summarized in the file AUTHORS in the distribution.) We thank them for their generosity as well.

This list intended to mention every contributor of a major package or feature we currently distribute; if you know of someone we have omitted, please report that as a manual bug.


 
 
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