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Linux Printing HOWTO
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11.1. Printing to a Unix/lpd host

11.1. Printing to a Unix/lpd host

To allow remote machines to print to your printer using the LPD protocol, you must list the machines in/etc/hosts.equiv or/etc/hosts.lpd. (Note thathosts.equiv has a host of other effects; be sure you know what you are doing if you list any machine there). You can allow only certain users on the other machines to print to your printer by using the rs attribute; read the lpd man page for information on this.

11.1.1. With lpd

To print to another machine, you make an/etc/printcap entry like this:
# REMOTE djet500
lp|dj|deskjet:\
        :sd=/var/spool/lpd/dj:\
        :rm=machine.out.there.com:\
        :rp=printername:\
        :sh:
Note that there is still a spool directory on the local machine managed by lpd. If the remote machine is busy or offline, print jobs from the local machine wait in the spool area until they can be sent.

11.1.2. With rlpr

You can also use rlpr to send a print job directly to a queue on a remote machine without going through the hassle of configuring lpd to handle it. This is mostly useful in situations where you print to a variety of printers only occasionally. From the announcement forrlpr:

Rlpr uses TCP/IP to send print jobs to lpd servers anywhere on a network.

Unlike lpr, it *does not* require that the remote printers be explicitly known to the machine you wish to print from, (e.g. through /etc/printcap) and thus is considerably more flexible and requires less administration.

rlpr can be used anywhere a traditional lpr might be used, and is backwards compatible with traditional BSD lpr.

The main power gained by rlpr is the power to print remotely *from anywhere to anywhere* without regard for how the system you wish to print from was configured. Rlpr can work as a filter just like traditional lpr so that clients executing on a remote machine like netscape, xemacs, etc, etc can print to your local machine with little effort.

Rlpr is available from Metalab .

Linux Printing HOWTO
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  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire