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11.2.2.2. Other formats

It would lead us too far to discuss all possible audio formats and ways to play them. An (incomplete) overview of other common sound playing and manipulating software:

  • Ogg Vorbis: Free audio format: see the GNU audio directory for tools - they might be included in your distribution as well. The format was developed because MP3 is patented.

  • Real audio and video: realplay from RealNetworks.

  • SoX or Sound eXchange: actually a sound converter, comes with th e play program. Plays .wav, . ogg and various other formats, including raw binary formats.

  • Playmidi: a MIDI player, see the GNU directory.

  • AlsaPlayer: from the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture project, see the AlsaPlayer web site.

  • mplayer: plays just about anything, including mp3 files. More info on the MPlayerHQ website.

  • hxplay: supports RealAudio and RealVideo, mp3, mp4 audio, Flash, wav and more, see HelixDNA (not all components of this software are completely free).

  • rhythmbox: based on the GStreamer framework, can play everything supported in GStreamer, which claims to be able to play everything, see the Rhythmbox and GStreamer sites.

Check your system documentation and man pages for particular tools and detailed explanations on how to use them.

Note I don't have these applications on my system!
 

A lot of the tools and applications discussed in the above sections are optional software. It is possible that such applications are not installed on your system by default, but that you can find them in your distribution as additional packages. It might also very well be that the application that you are looking for is not in your distribution at all. In that case, you need to download it from the application's web site.

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