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Chapter 13. Bibliography

Most of the information in this book has been extracted from the kernel documentation and source code. This is the best place for information on how to build and install the kernel, and is usually kept up to date when things in the build procedure change.

Books

There are a number of very good Linux kernel programming books availble, but only a few that deal with building and installing the kernel. Here is a list of books that the author has found useful when dealing with the Linux kernel.

General Linux Books

Ellen Siever, Aaron Weber, Stephen Figgins, Robert Love, Arnold Robbins. Linux in a Nutshell, Fifth Edition . O'Reilly & Associates, 2005

This book can be has the most complete and authoritative command reference for Linux. It covers almost every different command that you will ever need to use.

Yaghmour, Karim. Building Embedded Systems . O'Reilly & Associates, 2003.

This book, although mainly oriented toward the embedded Linux developer, has a great section on how to build up a cross-compiler toolchain and kernel. It is highly recommended for that, as well as other portions of this book that are very relevant for people wishing to learn more about how to customise a Linux kernel and the rest of the system.

Linux Kernel Books

Most of these books are oriented toward the programmer who is interested in learning how to program within the kernel. They are much more technically oriented than this book, but are a great place to start if you wish to learn more about the code that controls the kernel.

Jonathan Corbet, Alessandro Rubini, and Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition . O'Reilly & Associates, 2005.

This book covers thow the different kernel device driver subsystems work, and provides lots of examples of working drivers. It is recommended for anyone wanting to work with Linux kernel drivers. It is also available online for free at http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/.

Love, Robert. Linux Kernel Development, Second Edition . Novell Press Publishing, 2005.

Robert Love's book covers almost all areas of the Linux kernel, showing how everything works together. It is a great place to start learning about the different portions of the kernel internals.

Bovet, Daniel P. and Cesate, Marco. Understanding the Linux Kernel, Third Edition . O'Reilly & Associates, 2005.

This book goes into the design and implementation of the core Linux kernel. It is a great reference for understanding the algorithms used within the different portions of the kernel. It is highly recommended for anyone wanting to understand the details of how the kernel works.


 
 
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