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SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop Deployment Guide
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11.1 Integrating Linux and AD Environments

With a Linux client configured as an Active Directory client that is joined to an existing Active Directory domain, benefit from various features not available on a pure SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop Linux client:

Browsing Shared Files and Folders with SMB

Both Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, and Konqueror, its KDE counterpart, support browsing shared resources through SMB.

Sharing Files and Folders with SMB

Both Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, and Konqueror, its KDE counterpart, support sharing folders and files as in Windows.

Accessing and Manipulating User Data on the Windows Server

Through Nautilus and Konqueror, users are able to access their Windows user data and can edit, create, and delete files and folders on the Windows server. Users can access their data without having to enter their password again and again.

Offline Authentication

Users are able to log in and access their local data on the Linux machine even if they are offline (for example, using a laptop) or the AD server is unavailable for other reasons.

Windows Password Change

This port of AD support in Linux enforces corporate password policies stored in Active Directory. The display managers and console support password change messages and accept your input. You can even use the Linux passwd command to set Windows passwords.

Single-Sign-On through Kerberized Applications

Many applications of both desktops are Kerberos-enabled (kerberized), which means they can transparently handle authentication for the user without the need for password reentry at Web servers, proxies, groupware applications, or other locations.

A brief technical background for most of these features is given in the following section. For directions for file and printer sharing, refer to GNOME User Guide and KDE User Guide, where you can learn more about AD enablement in the GNOME and KDE application worlds.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop Deployment Guide
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