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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Essentials eBook now available in PDF and ePub formats for only $9.99
RHEL 6 Essentials contains 40 chapters and over 250 pages.

Chapter 1. The LVM Logical Volume Manager

This chapter provides a summary of the features of the LVM logical volume manager that are new for the initial release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Following that, this chapter provides a high-level overview of the components of the Logical Volume Manager (LVM).

1.1. New and Changed Features

This section lists new and changed features of the LVM logical volume manager that are included with the initial release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.
  • You can define how a mirrored logical volume behaves in the event of a device failure with the mirror_image_fault_policy and mirror_log_fault_policy parameters in the activation section of the lvm.conf file. When this parameter is set to remove, the system attempts to remove the faulty device and run without it. When this parameter is set to allocate, the system attempts to remove the faulty device and tries to allocate space on a new device to be a replacement for the failed device; this policy acts like the remove policy if no suitable device and space can be allocated for the replacement. For information on the LVM mirror failure policies, see Section 4.4.3.1, “Mirrored Logical Volume Failure Policy”.
  • For the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 release, the Linux I/O stack has been enhanced to process vendor-provided I/O limit information. This allows storage management tools, including LVM, to optimize data placement and access. This support can be disabled by changing the default values of data_alignment_detection and data_alignment_offset_detection in the lvm.conf file, although disabling this support is not recommended.
    For information on data alignment in LVM as well as information on changing the default values of data_alignment_detection and data_alignment_offset_detection, see the inline documentation for the /etc/lvm/lvm.conf file, which is also documented in Appendix B, The LVM Configuration Files. For general information on support for the I/O Stack and I/O limits in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, see the Storage Administration Guide.
  • In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, the Device Mapper provides direct support for udev integration. This synchronizes the Device Mapper with all udev processing related to Device Mapper devices, including LVM devices. For information on Device Mapper support for the udev device manager, see Section A.3, “Device Mapper Support for the udev Device Manager”.
  • For the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 release, you can use the lvconvert --repair command to repair a mirror after disk failure. This brings the mirror back into a consistent state. For information on the lvconvert --repair command, see Section 4.4.3.3, “Repairing a Mirrored Logical Device”.
  • As of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 release, you can use the --merge option of the lvconvert command to merge a snapshot into its origin volume. For information on merging snapshots, see Section 4.4.5, “Merging Snapshot Volumes”.
  • As of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 release, you can use the --splitmirrors argument of the lvconvert command to split off a redundant image of a mirrored logical volume to form a new logical volume. For information on using this option, see Section 4.4.3.2, “Splitting Off a Redundant Image of a Mirrored Logical Volume”.
  • You can now create a mirror log for a mirrored logical device that is itself mirrored by using the --mirrorlog mirrored argument of the lvcreate command when creating a mirrored logical device. For information on using this option, see Section 4.4.3, “Creating Mirrored Volumes”.

 
 
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