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Thinking in Java
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Tabbed panes

The JTabbedPane allows you to create a “tabbed dialog,” which has file-folder tabs running across one edge, and all you have to do is press a tab to bring forward a different dialog.

// Demonstrates the Tabbed Pane.
// <applet code=TabbedPane1 width=350 height=200></applet>
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.event.*;
import java.awt.*;
import com.bruceeckel.swing.*;

public class TabbedPane1 extends JApplet {
  private String[] flavors = {
    "Chocolate", "Strawberry", "Vanilla Fudge Swirl",
    "Mint Chip", "Mocha Almond Fudge", "Rum Raisin",
    "Praline Cream", "Mud Pie"
  private JTabbedPane tabs = new JTabbedPane();
  private JTextField txt = new JTextField(20);
  public void init() {
    for(int i = 0; i < flavors.length; i++)
        new JButton("Tabbed pane " + i));
    tabs.addChangeListener(new ChangeListener() {
      public void stateChanged(ChangeEvent e) {
        txt.setText("Tab selected: " +
    Container cp = getContentPane();
    cp.add(BorderLayout.SOUTH, txt);
  public static void main(String[] args) { TabbedPane1(), 350, 200);
} ///:~

In Java, the use of some sort of “tabbed panel” mechanism is quite important, because in applet programming the use of pop-up dialogs is discouraged by automatically adding a little warning to any dialog that pops up out of an applet.

When you run the program, you’ll see that the JTabbedPane automatically stacks the tabs if there are too many of them to fit on one row. You can see this by resizing the window when you run the program from the console command line.
Thinking in Java
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   Reproduced courtesy of Bruce Eckel, MindView, Inc. Design by Interspire