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Thinking in Java
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true and false

All conditional statements use the truth or falsehood of a conditional expression to determine the execution path. An example of a conditional expression is A == B. This uses the conditional operator == to see if the value of A is equivalent to the value of B. The expression returns true or false. Any of the relational operators you’ve seen earlier in this chapter can be used to produce a conditional statement. Note that Java doesn’t allow you to use a number as a boolean, even though it’s allowed in C and C++ (where truth is nonzero and falsehood is zero). If you want to use a non-boolean in a boolean test, such as if(a), you must first convert it to a boolean value by using a conditional expression, such as if(a != 0).
Thinking in Java
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   Reproduced courtesy of Bruce Eckel, MindView, Inc. Design by Interspire