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Ruby Programming
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For ... In

Earlier we said that the only built-in Ruby looping primitives were while and until. What's this ``for'' thing, then? Well, for is almost a lump of syntactic sugar. When you write

for aSong in songList
  aSong.play
end

Ruby translates it into something like:

songList.each do |aSong|
  aSong.play
end

The only difference between the for loop and the each form is the scope of local variables that are defined in the body. This is discussed on page 87.

You can use for to iterate over any object that responds to the method each, such as an Array or a Range.

for i in ['fee', 'fi', 'fo', 'fum']
  print i, " "
end
for i in 1..3
  print i, " "
end
for i in File.open("ordinal").find_all { |l| l =~ /d$/}
  print i.chomp, " "
end
produces:
fee fi fo fum 1 2 3 second third

As long as your class defines a sensible each method, you can use a for loop to traverse it.

class Periods
  def each
    yield "Classical"
    yield "Jazz"
    yield "Rock"
  end
end

periods = Periods.new for genre in periods   print genre, " " end
produces:
Classical Jazz Rock
Ruby Programming
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