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Set Methods

A set object has a number of member methods. In the following definitions, s is a set object.

The following transformation functions update a set.

s. clear

Remove all items from the set.

s. copy → set

Copy the set to make a new set. This is a shallow copy. All objects in the new set are references to the same objects as the original set.

s. pop → object

Remove an arbitrary object from the set, returning the object. If the set was already empty, this will raise a KeyError exception.

s. add ( new )

Adds element new to the set. If the object is already in the set, nothing happens.

s. remove ( old )

Removes element old from the set. If the object old is not in the set, this will raise a KeyError exception.

s. discard ( old )

Removes element old from the set. If the object old is not in the set, nothing happens.

s. update ( new ) → object

Merge values from the new set into the original set, adding elements as needed. It is equivalent to the following Python statement. s |= new.

s. intersection_update ( new ) → object

Update s to have the intersection of s and new . In effect, this discards elements from s , keeping only elements which are common to new and s . It is equivalent to the following Python statement. s &= new.

s. difference_update ( new ) → object

Update s to have the difference between s and new . In effect, this discards elements from s which are also in new . It is equivalent to the following Python statement. s -= new.

s. symmetric_difference_update ( new ) → object

Update s to have the symmetric difference between s and new . In effect, this both discards elements from s which are common with new and also inserts elements into s which are unique to new . It is equivalent to the following Python statement. s ^= new.

The following accessor methods provide information about a set.

s. issubset ( set ) → boolean

If s is a subset of set , return True, otherwise return False. Essentially, this is s <= set.

s. issuperset ( set ) → boolean

If s is a superset of set , return True, otherwise return False. Essentially, this is s >= set.

s. union ( new ) → set

If new is a proper set, return s | new. If new is a sequence or other iterable, make a new set from the value of new , then return the union, s | new. This does not update s .

>>> 
prime.union( (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) )

set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 13])
s. intersection ( new ) → set

If new is a proper set, return s & new. If new is a sequence or other iterable, make a new set from the value of new , then return the intersection, s & new. This does not update s .

s. difference ( new ) → set

If new is a proper set, return s - new. If new is a sequence or other iterable, make a new set from the value of new , then return the difference, s - new. This does not update s .

s. symmetric_difference ( new ) → set

If new is a proper set, return s ^ new. If new is a sequence or other iterable, make a new set from the value of new , then return the symmetric difference, s ^ new. This does not update s .


 
 
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