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OpenSuSE 11.1 Quick Start Guide
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1.2 Choosing the Installation Method

After having selected the installation medium, determine a suitable installation method and boot option that best match your needs:

Installing from the openSUSE Media

Choose this option, if you want to perform a stand-alone installation and do not want to rely on a network providing the installation data or the boot infrastructure. The installation proceeds exactly as outlined in Section 1.3, The Installation Workflow.

Installing from a Network Server

Choose this option, if you have an installation server available in your network or want to use an external server as the source of your installation data. This setup can be configured to use from physical media (Floppy, CD/DVD, or hard disk) for booting or configured to boot via network using PXE/BOOTP. Refer to Section 1.2.1, Installing from a Network Server Using SLP, Section 1.2.2, Installing from a Network Source without SLP, or Section 1.0, Remote Installation, (↑ Reference ) for details.

Installing with instlux from Windows

Choose this installation option, if you prefer a smooth transition from using Windows to Linux. instlux allows you to boot into the openSUSE installation right from a running Windows by modifying the Windows boot loader. This installation option is only available from the DVD media. Refer to Section 1.2.3, Installing with instlux from Windows for details.

openSUSE supports several different boot options from which you can choose depending on the hardware available and on the installation scenario you prefer. Booting from the openSUSE media or using instlux are the most straightforward options, but special requirements might call for special setups:

Table 1-1 Boot Options

Boot Option

Description

DVD/CD-ROM

This is the easiest boot option. This option can be used if the system has a local CD-ROM drive that is supported by Linux.

instlux

instlux is installed under Microsoft Windows* and makes it possible to boot directly into the installation

Floppy

The data for generating boot floppies are located on DVD 1 in the /boot/architecture/ directory. A README with instructions on how to create the boot floppies is available in the same directory.

PXE or BOOTP

Booting over the network must be supported by the system's BIOS or firmware and a boot server must be available in the network. This task can also be handled by another openSUSE system. See http://en.opensuse.org/SuSE_install_with_PXE_boot for more information.Refer to Section 1.0, Remote Installation, (↑ Reference ) for more information.

Hard Disk

openSUSE installation can also be booted from the hard disk. To do this, copy the kernel (linux) and the installation system (initrd) from the directory /boot/architecture/loader on the installation media to the hard disk and add an appropriate entry to the existing boot loader of a previous openSUSE installation.

1.2.1 Installing from a Network Server Using SLP

If your network setup supports OpenSLP and your network installation source has been configured to announce itself via SLP (described in Section 1.2, Setting Up the Server Holding the Installation Sources, (↑ Reference )), boot the system, press F4 in the boot screen and select SLP from the menu.

The installation program configures the network connection with DHCP and retrieves the location of the network installation source from the OpenSLP server. If the automatic DHCP network configuration fails, you are prompted to enter the appropriate parameters manually. The installation then proceeds as described below with the exception of the network configuration step needed prior to adding additional repositories. This step is not needed as the network is already configured and active at this point.

1.2.2 Installing from a Network Source without SLP

If your network setup does not support OpenSLP for the retrieval of network installation sources, boot the system and press F4 in the boot screen to select the desired network protocol (NFS, HTTP, FTP, or SMB/CIFS). Provide the server's address and the path to the installation media.

The installation program automatically configures the network connection with DHCP. If this configuration fails, you are prompted to enter the appropriate parameters manually. The installation retrieves the installation data from the source specified. The installation then proceeds as described below with the exception of the network configuration step needed prior to adding additional repositories. This step is not needed as the network is already configured and active at this point.

1.2.3 Installing with instlux from Windows

instlux is a Microsoft Windows* application that prepares your computer to directly boot into the openSUSE installation without having to adjust BIOS settings. instlux is only available on DVD media. To use instlux, insert the openSUSE media under Windows. The openSUSE 11.1 Installer setup automatically starts. Choose a language for the installation and follow the instructions on the screen. The language you choose here is also preconfigured to be used for the openSUSE installation.

On the next reboot, the Microsoft Windows boot loader launches. Choose openSUSE 11.1 Installer to start the openSUSE installation. In order to proceed with the installation, you will be prompted to insert the installation media. The installation proceeds as described below. When Microsoft Windows is booted again, instlux is automatically uninstalled.

HINT: Installing openSUSE alongside Microsoft Windows

openSUSE can easily be installed alongside Microsoft Windows. Carry out the installation as described below—an existing Windows installation will automatically be detected and a dual boot option will be installed. If Windows covers the whole installation disk, the installation routine will make a reasonable proposal to shrink an existing Windows partition in order to make room for the openSUSE. Please read Resizing a Windows Partition prior to the installation for detailed information.

OpenSuSE 11.1 Quick Start Guide
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